tamposi plans $50m investment in new community bible fellowship

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Tamposi plans $50m investment in new community bible fellowship

Corporate Matching Gifts Many corporations offer matching gift programs to their employees and their families. Matching gift support often doubles or triples an individual's gift. Please contact your company's human resource department to obtain a match- ing gift form. Hilary is a double major in electrical and computer engineering and music. The SWE Scholarship Program pro- vides financial assistance for women admit- ted to accredited baccalaureate or graduate programs in preparation for careers in engi- neering, engineering technology, and com- puter science.

The minimum GPA for appHcants is 3. SWE, founded in , is a not-for- profit educational and service organization designed to be the driving force that estab- lishes engineering as a highly desirable career aspiration for women. SWE's goal is empow- ering women to succeed and advance in those aspirations and be recognized for thcir hfe-changing contributions and achieve- ments as engineers and leaders.

More than 1. Hyunwoo was awarded a Silver for his photography portfo- lio and Anna received a Gold for her ceram- ics. As a gold award winner, Anna had her work on display for six weeks at the Corcoran iallcry of Art in Washington, DC, over the summer.

Both students received tlie highest level of achievement at the regional level. Gold Keys, which qualified their work to be sent to New York for national-level adjudication. Only 1, students were awarded national honors out of 8, Gold Key regional winners whose Avork was con- sidered for national recognition. All works were evaluated for technical proficiency, originality and the emergence of an authen- tic voice.

Students took AP Exams in May after complet- ing challenging college-level courses at their high schools. About 18 percent of the more than 1. Winners received Savings Bonds and were honored with students from Amesbury, Triton, Newburyport, Pentucket and Whittier at a luncheon on September Derek Falvey '00 was the keynote speaker at the tenth annual presentation of the Excellence in Education Awards lunch- eon.

Falvey, a graduate of Trinity College, now runs an independent company, Acuvar Creative. His own path to becoming an entrepreneur was a circuitous one, but per- haps a natural outgrowth of his coUege stud- ies in marketing and computer science. Fair Trade coffee benefits both coffee- farming families and at-risk children around the world. The decision to switch to fair trade coffee was made because of a growing environmental awareness on campus, accord- ing to Director of Dining Services David Alonzi.

The coffees support children's charities dedicated to feeding, clothing and educating at-risk children in coffee-growing countries. The char- ities supported by Pura Vida focus on build- ing more hopeful futures for children in cof- fee-growing countries through meal centers, computer classrooms, soccer teams and other programs that strengthen the health, confi- dence, and spirit of at-risk children.

Fair Trade is based on a direct relationship with producers, one in which they are paid a guaranteed living wage. No chemical inputs i. Serving Fair Trade Coffee is not only the right thing to do. It also tastes great. Spanish and French teachers David and Laurel Abusamra chaperoned a group to France for a visit that included a homestay and morning classes in Nice, swim- ming in the Mediterranean, and excursions to Monaco and St.

Paul de Vence. German teacher John Seufert and art teacher Geoff Brace accompanied a group of 13 to Germany, where students enjoyed homestays in the suburbs, daily language classes in Munich, a weekend trip to Berlin, a visit to the BMW factory, and all the excitement of being in the host country for the FIFA World Cup Soccer Tournament. All in a Day's Work will include case stories about people who use science every day in their careers.

They range from science teacher to forensics technician, firefighter to historical archaeologist, astronaut to deep- cave explorer, roller coaster designer to sport biomech- anist. The Science Teacher. Metz is editor of The Science Teacher. Chrisde RawUns-Jackson, who worked closely with the website designers, were guests of the developer, Magic Hour, at the award banquet on November 9 at the Copley Place Marriott.

About 1 ,r 00 people attended. While the committee is waiting to hear if its plan is accepted, the librarians are moving forward with some of the action plans generated in meetings. This fall the focus is on exploring some of the new online web tools and to applying them to the vision and mission of the librarians.

Links to all these are found on the Academy's website www. Select Academics and then Library. Make sure pop-ups are enabled on your computer as each opens in a new window. The library staff started with a blog last winter; this fall they eval- uated its impact. While they had thought it would be a wonderful way to communicate new resources and search tools to students, the librar- ians discovered that the audience was primarily parents and alums.

Why would a student read about the Hbrary when he could ask a librarian face-to-face or see displays in person? Thus, the librarians adjusted their focus to inform readers about what's happening in the library. All three 0en Brown, Susan Chase, and Monica Blondin will be contributing to the blog each week to offer different perspectives on the library program. As they found themselves taking more and more pictures to use on their blog, they wanted a space to share all of them.

Take a look at their Flickr site for library scenes, events, and displays. The intent is to document not only the vibrant library program but also how the library looks throughout the seasons. New books arrive each month in the library.

With the new LibraryThing account, all of the new additions to the library collec- tion are announced. An RSS feed to the blog displays five random titles each time the blog is opened. The latest tool is del. They add tags to create order and an index format.

Currently, the librarians are using it for profes- sional development, sharing among themselves some of their favorite librarian online tools. However, they see the potential implications for group projects and sharing research. This fall Jen Brown and Susan Chase attended Internet Librarian International where the major focus was on new online tools for libraries.

They gained insight into selecting the new tools which not only further their program but which students should master to be successful information users in the 21st century. They'll share what they learn on their blog and welcome comments from readers. Her paper, pre- pared for Bill Quigley's AP US History course, studied the Swanson Facility at Tallulah, a juvenile correction facility run by a private company and contracted by the state of Louisiana.

In re: Gault , that gave juveniles the right to an attorney and the same prece- dents as adults on trial. Before I wrote it I thought I would probably want to be a lawyer and now I still do. The youth facility, operated privately but contracted by the state, opened in in Louisiana.

Inmates included young thieves and murderers, but also teens who were merely caught driving without a license. What Lucy discovered, in her research of old news articles, the website of the Louisiana state government, and various books, was that adolescents often got stuck at Tallulah; the place that was sup- posed to offer rehabilitation actually offered no treatment and was really a prison. The guards hired by Transamerican Development Inc.

Inmates were beaten by guards and each other without intervention. In addition to the physical abuse came emotional neglect. Youths were often placed in soli- tary confinement for days, a procedure clearly outlawed by the courts in In re: Gault. Eventually there was a groundswell of public concern spearheaded by groups of parents and lawyers. Marches fol- lowed, although some parents feared ret- ribution for their children if they com- plained of conditions. Soon the Justice Department of the federal government became involved and sued the State of Louisiana for the abuse and denial of constitutional rights.

Though there was a series of investigations and the state committed to change, nothing really advanced. Part of the problem was the difficulty the state had canceling their contract with Transamerican Development Inc. Finally, in , a lawyer named Richard Marks was brought in and devised a way to dissolve the contract. By , the facility was closed and the residents were moved elsewhere. A new bill, called a Juvenile Justice Reform Act, was enacted and a movement to reform all state juvenile facilities gained momentum.

What started as a blemish in Louisiana's history became a model for other states of how to turn around a bad system of care delivery to youths. Most people don't really think about the issue of care and incarceration of delinquent youths, Lucy fears. We have to remember that it's not going to help if you just throw these kids in jail. That's not going to change anything.

NSMT, the largest non-profit producing theater in New England, welcomes approximately , patrons annually. In recent years, NSMT has gained a national and regional reputation for artistic achievement, specifically in the areas of developing new works and providing outstanding theater arts and education pro- dance, and acting.

Master classes with New York actors were an added opportunity each week. After lunch, the teens rehearsed from 1 p. To say Stage Four is an intense training program is an understatement. From all accounts, the experience was a huge success for everyone involved. Audiences raved about the performances and about The Performing Arts Center. Indeed, NSMT has become one of the region's leading providers of theater arts and education.

As the theater's education program has grown under the lead- ership of Director Burgess Clark, it has outgrown the rehearsal and performance space available at the hom. In past summers, the training program has used satellite facilities in Marblehead and at Pingree School, but this year they were looking for a new venue. The goal of the Summer Stages program is to provide pro- fessional training and opportuni- ties for youth in the areas of music theater, dance and acting.

Stage Three is a training and perform- ance program for eight to year-olds. Participants spent three weeks in classes and rehearsals preparing for a workshop produc- tion of the musical Once On This Island Jr. Mornings were spent in classes in acting, movement and music theater performance Monday through Thursday with two Friday Master Classes. Afternoons were devoted to rehearsals. Stage Four is an intensive pre-professional training program for students interested in the profession of music theater.

Led by Broadway professionals, the five-week program included master classes taught by professional actors, workshops led by professional educators and rehearsals for full-scale musical productions of Sweeney Todd and Footloose. The 54 students, ages 13 to 18, arrived every morning at 9 a.

From then until p. The students and staff were remarkably talented, and the shows were fabulous! Literally, hundreds of people from all over New England attended the performances and enjoyed The Performing Arts Center. The ultimate goal is for an international music theater program through North Shore Music Theatre where stu- dents can come and be chal- Footloose cast performs at the Academy lenged and celebrated at The Governor's Academy.

The campus is a perfect blend of beauty, architecture, nature and art. It's a perfect location to create music theater. Like us, NSMT's goal is to draw students from all over the country and the world. This is an exciting part- nership! There are always twists and turns leading to some- times surprising intersections and junctures. Dan dayman, Class of '75, started his edu- cational and artistic quest at The Governor's Academy in the fall of 1 97 1 , his first step to becoming what he is today- a true working studio artist.

Dan reflects fondly on his years at The Governor's Academy. Of utmost importance was the encouragement of his sophomore dorm master, Heb Evans, who taught him math for two years and coached him as a wrestler for all four years. Although Dan was a hard working but average wrestler, Evans treated him like a champion and took an avid interest in his musical and dramatic talents. Dan became more focused on theater after his sophomore year. English teacher and school theater director John Rice ignited Dan's interest in technical theater.

The teacher's inquisitive nature inspired Dan's naturally curious mind to explore the dynamics of set design and lighting. Dan describes John Rice as a former marine who brought the discipline of the service into his daily style of teaching and coaching.

Aware that there was not an extensive visual arts program in the s, the faculty and staff made certain arrangements to accommodate a creatively driven student such as Dan Clayman. A staff member from the maintenance crew and a faculty member arranged for Dan and some fellow students who were interested in sculpture to take informal Saturday classes to learn the safe use of power tools.

This basic knowledge of power tools gave Dan a great foundation for his future career as a sculptor; he still appre- ciates the school's response to his interests in such an out-of-the-box fashion. After graduating in the spring of , Dan's inclinations were still more towards the technical aspects of theater rather than the visual arts.

He began his freshman year at Connecticut College studying applied music, technical theater, and elementary education. The following year he took a leave and spent a year of travel and work. When he returned to Connecticut College in the fall of , his father was diagnosed with cancer and passed away in October of that year.

After the death of his father, Dan chose not to return to Connecticut College but decided, instead, to pursue a career in the 12 theater. For the next three years, Dan worked in theater and modern dance as a Hghting designer and stage manager. In the summer of , Dan returned to his studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, this time focusing on ceramics and appHed music.

UMass did not prove to be the best fit for Dan and he left after one year to work in the studio of Josh Simpson, an artist living in Shelburne Falls, MA. There he met his future wife, Terri Getz. They have been married for 25 years. Finally, he felt he had found a good match for his talents and interests. At first he focused on glass design before turning to glass sculpture and his life- long commitment to a career in the visual arts.

Today, 20 years after his graduation from RISD, Dan enjoys a career as a successful full-time studio artist. He lectures extensively at col- leges and museums; his work is in the permanent collec- tions of several museums and often is commissioned by corporations. He will be in an exhibit at Habatat Galleries in Detroit in and will have a major solo exhibition at the Mmt Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina in January of Dan lives near Providence with his wife Terri and their twin teenage daughters, Molly and Emma.

He describes his life as an artist and his work m the following way: "I am in contact with my work everyday. Most days I come to the studio as the working artist. Other days I come as an observer, to see what the 'artist' is doing. The work is continual, an ahvays evolving exploration of simple forms.

Using a vocabulary of extremely simple forms whose scale ranges from three to nine feet, these objects describe volumes in space. Some of the pieces are easily identifiable as vessels and may allude to holding volumes of water. Others are pure abstraction holding only quantities of air and space.

By taking away any real solid mass, I am left with just the skins of glass, bronze or graphite that define a measure of capacity. Other objects identifiable as a ramp. He often uses a process of glasswork called pate de verrc, in wlinh tiny pieces of crushed glass are worked into a paste and added to the artwork before being fired m. Using a variety of geo- metrical shapes, Dan often combines the glass with bronze forms to create an effect that suggests ancient tools or ceremonial objects.

Dan also creates large cast glass sculptures that often tower in height and soar into space. The placement and inclusion of light has always played a large role in Dan's work, but this sensibility is particularly prominent in his recent piece entitled, "Line, Form, and Shadow.

The installation soars 17 feet in height and uses trace paper, a translucent and light conducting mate- rial. Even though it is a change of direction in material use for Dan, this immense sculpture still uses the incorporation of light as a central theme, much like his previous works. One of the many mysteries of light is that it refuses to reveal any of its essence until it reflects on something other than itself.

The installation is surrounded by carefully placed flood and spot lights so that light is channeled down through the cones. Since the installa- tion is so large, viewers arc invited to step inside the cones and become an active p. Full-time faculty mem- bers at the Academy are eligible for these grants after eight contiinwus years of service to the school.

Below she recounts her trip south and to Paris with her son, f on Guy ' Jon Guy journaling in front of the monument at Gettysburg dedicated to the Massachusetts 19th Volunteer Regiment During a particularly philosophical one-mile ride to Triton Middle School the other morning, my year-old, Nick, was busily critiquing a recent discussion his class had had about the merit of various profes- sions.

Who got them there? This time, "Myself" came through. As much time as either of my sons and I spent together during the school year, much of it was spent either shouting to each other in passing, or some- times even shouting in frustration. The time to sit, share, and relish together is not easily released amid the rigors of the academic year. Yet strangely, it was the King of Rigors — the dreaded junior thesis paper - that freed us, setting us off on the first of what I hope will become many journeys.

And the young man we have most to thank for igniting our mutual wanderlust is one James B. Wiggin, a young New Hampshire man who died years ago, almost before he had time to live. James B. Wiggin was a country boy who loved his country enough to enlist in the Federal Army in , and loved his family enough to write home frequently as the 19th Massachusetts Regiment wound its way southward though a chain of bloody battles, in pursuit of Lee's army.

Somewhat miraculously, a handful of his letters sur- vived, and as my son Jon and I poured over them in the Phillips Library of the Peabody Essex Museum, we found ourselves being drawn to him line by line.

He was humble and down-to-earth, a young man striving to stay strong in the face of war. He endeared himself to us as much by his utter lack of pretense as his salty language. He was the kid next door who, for both Jon and me, painted a human face on the War Between the States. Slowly and steadily he crept into our lives; he became our secret obsession; he unlocked our need to understand how any man could enlist and endure such a horrible war, to the point where, one gray day in July , we stood over his grave in Tamworth, New Hampshire, paying our respects.

Ironically, he had survived the war, only to die from its effects just as the war ended. Completely smitten by James B. Wiggin and the thousand young men like him who comprised the relatively unheralded 19th Massachusetts Volunteers, Jon and I took advantage of a summer sabbatical award to retrace the path of that regiment.

I suspect that we were each a little nervous about tak- ing off on such a romanticized whim. Trusting his almost encyclopedic knowledge of the causes and course of the war, I bestowed upon him full responsibiHty for deciding where we would go and when we would move on. He, in turn, trusted me to get us there. The beauty of that arrangement was in the simplicity of our interdepend- ence, as well as the potential for growth it presented, for Jon has been known to ago- nize when having to make unrehearsed deci- sions; and as for me, I find driving through unfamiliar cities terrifying.

But we shared a passion and a goal, and as much as he needed a chauffeur, I needed to learn from an expert about a period of our history to which I have always felt uncannily attached. The famous earthworks are the miles of embank- ments desperately constructed by rebel sol- diers in a literal "last-ditch" effort to save themselves, their army, and their rebel coun- try, and surveying them felt eerily disquiet- ing.

From there, we moved on to the Crater, most recently famous in the opening scene of the movie "Cold Mountain. Then on to Fredericksburg, Virginia, site of the failed pontoon crossing under the stewardship of General Burnsides for whom sideburns were named and the eventual massacre of his troops as a result of his tragic strategic faux-pas — ordering his troops up an occupied hill.

As we stood at the base of that hill, the words of our spirit mentor James B. Wiggin haunted us: "I got through the battle of Fredericksburg safe and sound and unhurt glory to god for that. I never was so sick of anything in my life as I am of the war. We are all playd out intirely [sic]. Since the 19th Massachusetts saw action in all four, Jon and I felt com- pelled to follow their footsteps to Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania.

Reading from Confederates in the Attic, Jon directed me off the battlefield circuit to a side road leading to Elwood, the final resting place for Stonewall Jackson's amputated arm, as well as homestead turned army hospital with floorboards and ceilings still blotched with blood. Jon fell naturally into conversation with the two Elwood vol- unteers who, impressed with his knowledge, pulled out maps charting the movement of the 19th Massachusetts in the nearby battle- field.

Only minutes later we were there, walking the perimeter, advancing as our friend James may have done, separated from history only by time. Having breathed and reHved the War relentless for the past week, we decided to turn northward towards Frederick, Maryland, where the Museum of Civil War Medicine awaited us. According to his gravestone, James B. Wiggin finished his mil- itary service as a medic, and as his poignant letters home suggested, an early bout with typhoid probably debilitated him to the Musee du Louvre, Paris, at dusk point where his duty was "to work in the hospital It was there on the third and last day of battle that the 19th Massachusetts volunteers rushed to the aid of other exhausted regiments and pushed back the confederates at the second line of defense.

As went the battle, so, eventually, went the war. But this trip was obviously more than just travel. It was a time for Jon and me to shut out the rest of the world and live in the space of our shared curiosity. Ironically, James' shortened life guided us so far back in history, but led us so far ahead in terms of our closeness.

I remembered that closeness one day last December when, for some reason, I sud- denly found myself thinking about my own mortality. I mentally skimmed my "short list" of places I've wanted to take my chil- dren - Prague, Venice, Machu Picchu He had taught mc so much about the Civil War, and I had spent enough months in Paris as a student to feel that if the city and I still belonged together, which we do, then certainly it would embrace my son.

Now it was payback time, so in March, we landed in Paris with a guidebook, a map, and two sets of good walking shoe:;. For the first few days, I was in charge. I carefully outlined the options for explo- ration and let Jon choose, depending on his interest and stamina. Together, we invaded Paris neighborhood by neighborhood, from the stylish and refined "Old City" of the first "arrondissement," to the colorful and elegant Jewish Quarter, to the buzzing Latin Quarter, to the slightly seedier Montmartre.

We lost ourselves in art and in the sociology of the street. We mastered the metro. We threw crumbs of our crepes to Parisian pigeons. It didn't take long, however, until I noticed a subtle change in Jon. His deep appreciation of the world around him, which I had witnessed on our previous trip together, was still very niuch intact. Despite my best intentions of show- ing him my i'ans, he was showing me his.

He walked me up and down the little streets constituting the backdrop for the film Amelie, or, as Parisians have come to identify it, "le Paris d'Amelie PouHn. But not unlike the 19th Massachusetts at Gettysburg, Jon reached his peak under threat of hostility at the Place de la Sorbonne. There, the heat of pre-riot tensions between students and police that sent a chill down my spine and a major yellow streak down my back put a grin on his face as he jogged into the melee, his camera to his eye.

Indeed, watching him frame each of the pictures he took throughout our week together shed new light on this, my son, and his unique, evolving view of the- world. Yes, this trip, too, was obviously more than just travel. Once again, it was a time for us to shut out the rest of the world and live, as before, in the space of our shared curiosity. But this time, as I walk along the Seine next to an engaged, utterly comfortable and even exhilarated young man, I am suddenly aware that time is pass- ing, the excited but slightly nervous boy who had sat next to me on the plane to Paris nearly a week earlier was evolving before my very eyes.

Poor Mrs. Wiggin never had that luxury. I still fully intend to take my kids to Paris, to Prague, to Venice and Machu Picchu, along with any other wonderful place that hap- pens to turn up on my "short list. As the website wwiv. The idea became reality in summer AH of these atter tive parents had been convinced by the Academy's friend an tutor Howard Sticklor and Associate Director of Admission Isaia Suggs '78 that what their children were about to begin would t a great opportunity and a great experience.

They each decide j that they were willing to bravely risk trusting their children wit strangers. Each student and each parent beHeved what M Sticklor and Mr. Suggs had told them - that this three-week edi cational experience would be a beneficial part of building stronger academic foundation. We took on that responsibility wit absolute confidence. We became partners that evening with eac other, the children and their parents in building that strongt foundation.

Th mornings and evenings were intense, full of new informatioi questions, discussions, homework assignments, tutorial session reading, tests, photography, reports, PowerPoint lessons, interne research, group projects and laughter. Howard taught them explore the impact of theory in science though the study of biol- gy. Academy Spanish teacher Olga DeGrasse introduced them to panish and the history of how the European language found its way ito the Western hemisphere.

Albert DeGrasse taught English and ony through poetry. Their nowledge of Hispaniola was aug- lented by a trip to the Boston listorical Society. Dixon was pleased. The first two Fridays we went off campus to explore and have different kind of fun. On the second Friday we were joined by stu- ents from England who came with akini and former jirofcssional bas- etball player Steve Bucknall ' These counselors were models of what is possible.

In particular, current college students and college graduates who held high stan- dards for themselves were demanding the same high standards for the Project RISE students. The educators in the classroom daily expressed that they believed in the students'abilities and told them they could achieve everything we assigned. Outside the classroom, these young adults echoed that mes- sage and worked with the stu- dents to help them achieve that goal. Most days ended the same.

After a few games of basketball, pizza, video games, teen talk and ice cold popsicles, counselors and coordinators gave the last call for the night. Breakfast at a. Throughout the weeks we witnessed these students learn more about themselves, each other and the work!

On the last Friday, the students prepared to show their parents what they hati k'. Hveryone agreed that il had hccn tlirce weeks wortli risking. Wc all tclt gratcfvil lor the support ot the Acidciny. Duty called them away from their studies to the mil- itary action in Europe and the Pacific. At the Academy, several students left the bucolic rural set- ting where they were preparing for college before they received their diplomas.

When Headmaster John M. Some had actually applied for readmission to the Academy after returning from the service but were denied. The headmaster believes the school officials at the time feared the considerably older and more worldly vets might not be the best peers for the young and innocent students on campus. Some of the vets went back to their pubhc high schools or another prep school or straight to college. On Memorial Day, May 29, , six former students of the Academy belatedly received their diplomas from Governor Dummer Academy at a ceremony in the school's Moseley Chapel at 12 noon.

John R. While the lack of an Academy diploma hardly held these men back from the consid- erable achievements in their lives, receiving John Whitney '44 receives his diploma from Headmaster John M. Doggett the status of alumnus 60 years later still felt sweet. I was so pleased to be honored; it was terrific. It was great to reunite with old friends.

He served in the gun battalion as an anti- aircraft radar operator. Whitney and Company. He still oper- ates the company and resides in Walpole, MA with his wife Katherine. His son. Gordon Hoyt was equally pleased. Weeks after the event, family and friends were sending me cut outs of the story that ran in the Globe and other papers; I was flattered that so many people cared.

Gosh, they look so young. They looked like an excellent cross sec- tion of young people. Army in March of his junior year at the Academy. Since college graduation, Hoyt has worked in the insurance business, cur- rently serving as Chairman of Hermitage Insurance Company. He resides in Queensbury, New York, with his wife Cynthia. They have two grown children.

Homer Ambrose couldn't make the trip but expressed his pleas- ure at the recognition. It's hanging on the wall of my ofiBce," he said. I'm just extremely honored to be remembered by the Academy. He Homer spent 20 years of commissioned service in the U.

Army Corps of Engineers. He earned a B. He is also a gradu- ate of the U. Army Command and General Staff College. Wally Bolton offered an understatement when asked for a reaction to the belated diploma. Wally, a member of the Class of , was inducted into the service in October, and served in Normandy, France, the Rhineland, the Ardennes, and Central Europe. He was a gun crewman and a gunner in an artillery battery of Patton's Third Army His battalion was the first to arrive at St.

Lo, France. At war's end, he was stationed in Linn, Austria. Following the war, he attended Brown University and gr. After graduation, he worked in his fam- ily's business, Bolton-Emerson, Inc. They have three grown children. Dave Barnard, Class of , volunteered for the service in fall of He and his wife Susan have four grown children. When he was notified of the Academy's plans, William "Bill" Barrell, felt honored. After 60 some years, I was very grateful," he said. There were great people, teachers and camaraderie," he recalled.

In February , he was assigned to the 95th Infantry Division. His unit arrived in Europe on August 17, and engaged with enemy forces in northern France, the Rhineland and Central Europe. On November, 20, , he was wounded in action and was subsequently awarded a Purple Heart and Bronze Star. Upon discharge in June l'M5, he entered the Macintosh School of Accounting and went on to work as Treasurer of his tannly owned business.

The Lawrence Duck Company, until he retired in The Acatlcmy hopes to honor any other veterans who K'lt ihe St liool before gradu. Please eont. Throughout my seventeen-year existence, I've been blessed with wonderful family and friends, not to mention an outlook on life that even amazes me at times.

Yet no one ever said life was easy - we face an over- whelming chaos of expectation, confusion, love, hate, and everything in between. As a philosopher, I've always debated the meaning of life and why I was placed on Earth. Sometimes, I feel empowered to rush towards my destiny.

At other times, though, I find it almost impossible to gather up the strength to continue. Does life reaUy matter? Of course it does, but we've been known to take it way too seriously. There's been many a day when I disappear from this mortal realm and ascend into the world of dreams: wondering how a collection of organic mol- ecules can assemble into a sentient, miracu- lous creature capable of absolutely anything he sets his mind to. If most of us don't even know the secret of life, are we taking it for granted?

Is focusing on hterary analysis, impHcit differentiation, and poetic meter really as important as my teachers say it is? Nonetheless, I've always loved to learn, and my times have been filled with awards and recognition for the way I apply my intellect. A great thing, but learning isn't my top pas- sion in life. Ever since I was a little boy, my heart has yearned to reach out to new people and help them in any way I could.

Kindness is a price- less treasure; love conquers all. I am Com apart by conflict, and nearly driven to tears by many of the hardships every human being must endure. But how am I to fight against fighting? Shyness and fear of others' opinions have silenced me for too long. I have finally embraced the potential within nic. My soul is unlocked through love. My only wish is for all hatred to be completely eradicated from this world. I am the guardian of humanity: my brother's keeper, protector of the innocent and destroyer of evil.

If only there were more hours in the day, more years in my being - then maybe I would be able to perform my duty. I'm not the only one - there is power in numbers, and I rejoice in the sacred bond of trust between two people that Ave call friendship. Many have said that I have the golden touch.

Looking out at all of you, I disagree: I'm not the miracle worker. My friends, you are the ones with incredible talent, motiva- tion, and powerful minds. I wouldn't be where I am today without you. Your encour- agement has sent me soaring. You have made yourselves my allies from the first time you met me. And it's about time that I stand up for you. The challenges of modern life can eas- ily overwhelm anyone who isn't ready. So I'm going to share my philosophy on life with you, in hope that I will reenergize your mind, pacify your souls, and prepare you for the journey ahead.

First of all, never give up. A true cham- pion is one who sets a goal and never loses sight of it. Everyone makes mistakes; there's no reason to cry over spilled milk. Have mental toughness and speed, and never be afraid to think something over. Don't let negative remarks slow you down, and do all that you cm. Think about who. Value otiuTs" lut's, hapiimess,. More often than not, you get what you deserve; be friendly, and others will reply in turn. There's no advantage to being mean. Live, and let live.

If there's no reason to interfere when you shouldn't or don't have to, ignore the situation. Even though you control your life completely, interaction with others isn't worthless at all, and can mean the difference between success and failure especially in the world of business. Have fun.

Without joy, this world would be a monotonous and dark place where nothing would be accomplished. Have a good sense of humor. Take things seriously only when you feel it is necessary. Realize that no one is perfect; mistakes are made, and approaching them with a smile is the right way to go.

Be kind. There is nothing in this world as powerful as kindness. Not only does it feel incredible, you'll make so many friends, savor so many moments, and never regret a thing. Respect is the right attitude to have towarcis the world. And, most importantly of all, believe in yourself, and there's nothing you can't do. Unlock the power widiin, and you'll go far- ther than your wildest dreams. Think of these things whenever you feel troubled. Never be afraid to ask for help: there's always someone there to lend a hand, no matter what.

I know I'll be there for all of you. And with that, I leave you to go back to your world, hoping that I've made a differ- ence in this community. Whether 1 see you every day, every couple of weeks, or just pass by now and then, I respect ami salute every- oiK' here. May our paths cross again. Whittlesey of Chappaqua, NY, died on April 1. He was sole proprietor of J.

He is survived by his wife Barbara and three children. Commander and remaining in the USNR for most of his life. After the war, he was a utilities engineer, helping to cre- ate the microwave communications for the state of California. He is best known for developing and co-inventing the Danforth Anchor with his uncle and for authoring many articles about safe boat- ing.

He is survived by his wife Nancy, three sons and several grandchildren. Sumner R. For 30 years, he was an attorney for Tyler and Reynolds Group in Boston before working as a partner for 30 years with Robbins, Noyce and Jansen in Boston.

He was active in the Winchester community serving on the boards of sev- eral institutions. His wife Lydia pre- deceased him. He is survived by two children and four grandchildren. After graduating from the Academy, he became a member of the infamous Amherst College "hurricane" class of After college, he enlisted it the Army Air Corps.

Following his serv- ice, he spent 35 years in sales administra- tion and as manager of operations in the home oil heating industry, working for Norwood Oil, Hampden Oil, Waterbury Petroleum Co. He was an avid golfer and belonged to several golf clubs. He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Patricia, three daughters, six grandchil- dren and five great grandchildren.

WilHam H. Later he ran his own management recruiting business. He was also a cham- pion sailor on the Great South Bay. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Joy, a son, and two granddaughters. Dennis Anderson '44 of Florida died on January After graduating from the Academy, he earned a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University. He is survived by his wife Mary and two sons. Keith A. Johnson '45 of Portland, Maine, died on April An all-state halfback, a three-time All-Telegram catcher, and leading base stealer, he was also a bas- ketball starter and earned an outdoor track letter in the sprints and long jump.

He played Twilight League and semi-pro baseball; one of the highlights of his career was playing for the New England All-Star team. In , he was inducted into the Maine Baseball Hall of Fame. His professional career was in banking and insurance; he retired from UNUM Insurance as a senior group service rep- resentative. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth, three children and several grandchildren. At the Academy he was a strong member of the ski team, known for his performance in the downhill slalom races.

He is survived by his wife Marilyn. At the Academy, he was a major force on the basketball team. He is survived by four children. A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross, he served as a gunnery officer in the navy during the Korean War before working until his retirement as a manufacturing executive at the J.

Cahill Co. A champion golfer, he won nine club championship between and at the Wentworth Fairways as well as the championship at Abenaqui Country Club in Rye Beach. He is sur- vived by his wife of 53 years, Virginia, two sons, a daughter, and three grand- children.

A graduate of Harvard College and Columbia School of Journalism, he was a sports promoter for most of his professional career, serv- ing as sports marketing director for Honda for 32 years. Irv Grossman Public Relations was involved in everything from professional volleyball and racquet- ball to Winston Cup racing. He is credited with, in , convincing heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson's manager, Cus D'Amato, to set up a title fight training center in Oceanside.

It was also his sug- gestion in to open the Heisman Trophy to women. He is survived by his wife Tora, three sons and four grandchildren. William Webster Atwell '51 died on August 8 in Houston, Texas, from compli- cations following liver cancer surgery. After graduating from the Academy, he earned a degree in business from Southern Methodist University. During the Korean War he was stationed in Panama. He began his professional life in the oil business and then became renowned for his success in real estate development and restoration in San Antonio.

He served on the boards of several corporations and clubs. He is survived by his wife of 15 years, Gena, three children, one step-daughter, and nine grandchildren. Edward S. Clapp '53 of Table Grove, Illinois, died on June He is survived by his wife Elsie. Woodbury "Woody" K. Dana III '60 died August 14 after a long illness. He worked for many years for the Coalition for the Psychiatrically Labeled and other programs for those liv- ing with mental illness.

He was a member of the Board of Directors of Shalom House. He was a supporter of local artists and exhibited his own work at the University of New England Art Gallery. He is survived by two sisters and their families. He is survived by his father and siblings. Edward Conway Young '73, former Academy history teacher and assistant headmaster, died on July 10 in Texas after a long illness. Marks School of Texas. He was a member of Tanner A. Church and Gamma Mu Boule.

He leaves his wife of 27 years. Correction: In the spring Archon, it was mistakenly written that George L. Boynton '56 received a Master's degree from Columbia University. In fact, it was his brother Peter who did, though both brothers earned Bachelor's degrees from Stanford. George's children's names were listed as Carly and Lynda; they should have been listed as Carly and Lindy.

The editor apologizes for the errors. The Governor's Academy Other Notes: The Athletic Hall of Fame Committee will make final decisions on new inductees for the fall of to join those inducted in and Gordon '69, Trustee President This Annual Report marks two monumental events at The Governor's Academy: Dan Morgan's retirement after a ten-year term as President of the Board of Trustees and the successful conclusion of the largest capital campaign in the Academy's history.

Both are intertwined, of course, because our recent 50 million dollar campaign had its roots in the strategic vision for our school that Dan and the Board of Trustees worked so hard to develop with Headmasters Bragdon and Doggett over the last decade.

Every item on the campaign list requiring funding was researched and reviewed countless times to insure its priority status and its essential contribution to the Academy's mission. As our school family well knows by now, these critical focal points of the campaign included faculty compensation, scholarship aid, three new major buildings, vast improve- ments in technology on campus, new faculty housing units, new athletic fields, and funds to increase our endowment. Each one of these elements of our long range plan came about because of a determined effort by Dan to incorporate strategic planning as part of his continuing agenda as Board President.

Seeing the plan through to completion is enor- mously rewarding, and much of the credit of the campaign's success rests fully with Dan. Having said that this mission was accomplished, please do not think for a moment that this Board of Trustees and Headmaster have any intention to rest on past laurels. Change, progress, and innovation are part of the lexicon of our school and are an absolute necessity for us to have remained so vital years into our long history.

The Independent School League, of which The Governor's Academy is a proud member, is a very competitive environ- ment, and we must constantly strive to stay ahead of the curve to succeed in our stated goal to be one of the finest small boarding schools in the country.

To borrow a line from the Academy's new view book that was recently published for our prospective applicants: "The competition is fierce at the ISL schools. So are we. Gifts to the Annual Fund pro- mote the continuation of a strong tradition at the Academy.

Robert M. Carrie W. Christopher C. Thomas '39 and Eunice Tenney P'69 C. Thomas Tenney, Jr. Turner '83, TR S. Robson Walton P'88 Courtney S. Anonymous Charles C. Gargaro A. Greenberg '95, TR David M. Morison '88 Richard A. Jeffcott Ogden '76 William F. Stirn '41 James C. Richardson '71 Henry M. Cammett Engineering, Inc. William B. Bates '72 Joseph J. Sherwood C.

Brown '81 Norman G. Brown '47 John C. Cohen '91 William S. Coulter '49 Wendy B. Cowie '79 David W. Culver, Jr. Hayes, Jr. Henry '56 David R. Jaffe '70 Kevin L. James '75 Norman S. Jessop '55 Jonathan K. Jett '93 Ralph F. Johnson '64 E. Knott '47 Nicolas A. LaPierre '92 Andrew D. MacVean '56 J. Scott Magrane, Jr. Anthony Marquis '55 Walter L. McGill '43 George E. McGregor, Jr. Moore, Jr. Stephen G. Morison P'88 Michael K. Mulligan '71 Theodore P.

Quimby '85 Robert M. Tarbell, Jr. Thomas '64 Bowen H. David A. Aron '91 Sideris D. Barrell, Jr. Burgess '84 Michael S. Burke '91 Peter T. Chalfant '57 Childs, Bertman, Tseckares, Inc. Orrin M. Colley '55 Robert B. Conklin '56 Peter R. Cowles '53 Timothy T. COVID app payment loophole won't be fixed by People who are told to isolate by the contact tracing app will not be able to claim financial support after lockdown ends, and may not be able to befo.

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I could have easily lost my job at certain points. And I knew also there were lots of parents, that silent majority, who were supportive of what I was trying to do. He was right. As well as Ofsted's official stamp of approval, the school's overwhelmingly white, working-class intake of pupils — who arrive with primary test results significantly below the national average — now make such good progress that Magna is in the top one per cent of schools nationally. Last year, 48 per cent of pupils gained the new high-level pass —Grade 5 — or above in GCSE English and maths, compared to the national average of 39 per cent.

Mr Tutt says a strong, consistent behaviour policy is key. As The Mail on Sunday witnessed last week, it has resulted in lessons where teachers stand at the front of the class and children listen. Doors are left open because there is no need to close them against the usual babble or the sound of teachers shouting to be heard above it. Even when pupils crowd around the front desk in the science lab to watch an experiment, the atmosphere is calm and relaxed.

In a history lesson about church reform, when a pupil struggles to pronounce the name of an archbishop, no one sniggers. Instead, the teacher simply repeats the name and asks the whole class to chant it three or four times because, as one of the school's mantras goes: 'Excellence is a habit: it needs routine and practice.

During the lunch break, children chat and laugh as they walk along the corridors the silent transition rules apply only between lessons , but there is no shouting, no swaggering and no pushing. One girl holds the door open because, as the sign on it reminds her, it is the polite thing to do. When Zach Best, 12, visited Magna's bright, spacious building while choosing a secondary school, he put it top of his list.

That's what it felt like,' he says. Magna is in a borough that has two grammar schools and they attract many of the area's brightest pupils. It makes Magna's progress all the more impressive. Pupils appear unfazed by the strict rules. You don't instantly get a punishment,' explains Jade Dupont, I love Magna. I'm really enjoying it and I know my education will help me get where I want. I went to a tough school but I did well out of it. He was a deputy head in Hertfordshire when he was offered the headship of Magna.

I know I can make a difference. Standards in coastal schools throughout England are a particular problem. Figures from Ofsted last summer showed nearly half of secondaries with a high proportion of white working-class pupils in the most deprived parts of the country were substandard.

By contrast, fewer than a fifth of schools with similar levels of disadvantaged pupils from ethnic minorities were rated inadequate or requiring improvement. A high-quality curriculum for all children, no matter what their starting point, and to make that a lever of social justice. I want children to have a full, rounded education and give them exposure to the cultural capital they will need to go forward. Reflecting on Ofsted's praise, he adds: 'Unless you have a grip on behaviour, you cannot do anything else, you can't move forward.

Discipline brings freedom — kids just want to get on in a safe environment without fear of ridicule if they get things wrong. There is certainty about homework and about after-school detentions. We are very clear about it. We are inflexible about it. The school — then called Ashdown Technology College — had such a poor reputation that parents would 'literally do anything' to avoid sending their children there.

Far from being put off by the regime or by job adverts that advise teachers not to apply if they 'want to be every student's best friend', staff are positive because of the order it brings and the freedom to teach unfettered by ill-discipline. Mr Tutt's approach also releases teachers from dealing with parents who complain when their children get in trouble. Heads of year and support staff, including a former policewoman, deal with parents, detentions and manning the centre where children who misbehave are sent to.

A full-time counsellor and an educational social worker ensure vulnerable youngsters are supported. It is a successful formula that resonates more widely than the school gates. One local shopkeeper says: 'The change in behaviour has been remarkable. The students seem completely different now. Parents are voting with their feet. From the low of pupils when Mr Tutt took over, the intake now stands at Oversubscribed for the past three years, it will soon reach its capacity of 1, Only last week, a child who had been withdrawn by parents who thought the regime 'too much' returned after experiencing poor behaviour elsewhere.

I know I can make a difference'. The move certainly challenges the view held by some in teaching that, in the modern world, children should not be expected to sit quietly and listen, that coming from a difficult background is an excuse for bad behaviour, and that teachers who fail to make lessons 'fun' deserve what they get. It is a view with which Mr Tutt has little sympathy. Heads need to be resilient. You might think, 'Why would I want to stick my head above the parapet and do what I think is right only to get shot down by some angry parents?

As the school week finished on Friday, form tutors stood at the door to shake the hand of every pupil and wish them a 'good weekend'. It is a novel, simple gesture which produces smiles all round. We want our children to have that too. Warmth and discipline are not mutually exclusive. The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Argos AO. Share this article Share. Share or comment on this article: How Britain's strictest headmaster turned around his failing school e-mail 6. Most watched News videos Record-breaking number of reckless drivers caught on their phones Cops pin down black woman who shouts 'I can't breathe' Footage surfaces showing China airport testing operation 'You're dead! Comments Share what you think.

View all. More top stories. Bing Site Web Enter search term: Search. Today's headlines Most Read Coronavirus restrictions will be eased over Christmas for five days and allow up to three households to meet Ironically, he had survived the war, only to die from its effects just as the war ended. Completely smitten by James B. Wiggin and the thousand young men like him who comprised the relatively unheralded 19th Massachusetts Volunteers, Jon and I took advantage of a summer sabbatical award to retrace the path of that regiment.

I suspect that we were each a little nervous about tak- ing off on such a romanticized whim. Trusting his almost encyclopedic knowledge of the causes and course of the war, I bestowed upon him full responsibiHty for deciding where we would go and when we would move on.

He, in turn, trusted me to get us there. The beauty of that arrangement was in the simplicity of our interdepend- ence, as well as the potential for growth it presented, for Jon has been known to ago- nize when having to make unrehearsed deci- sions; and as for me, I find driving through unfamiliar cities terrifying. But we shared a passion and a goal, and as much as he needed a chauffeur, I needed to learn from an expert about a period of our history to which I have always felt uncannily attached.

The famous earthworks are the miles of embank- ments desperately constructed by rebel sol- diers in a literal "last-ditch" effort to save themselves, their army, and their rebel coun- try, and surveying them felt eerily disquiet- ing. From there, we moved on to the Crater, most recently famous in the opening scene of the movie "Cold Mountain.

Then on to Fredericksburg, Virginia, site of the failed pontoon crossing under the stewardship of General Burnsides for whom sideburns were named and the eventual massacre of his troops as a result of his tragic strategic faux-pas — ordering his troops up an occupied hill.

As we stood at the base of that hill, the words of our spirit mentor James B. Wiggin haunted us: "I got through the battle of Fredericksburg safe and sound and unhurt glory to god for that. I never was so sick of anything in my life as I am of the war. We are all playd out intirely [sic]. Since the 19th Massachusetts saw action in all four, Jon and I felt com- pelled to follow their footsteps to Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania.

Reading from Confederates in the Attic, Jon directed me off the battlefield circuit to a side road leading to Elwood, the final resting place for Stonewall Jackson's amputated arm, as well as homestead turned army hospital with floorboards and ceilings still blotched with blood.

Jon fell naturally into conversation with the two Elwood vol- unteers who, impressed with his knowledge, pulled out maps charting the movement of the 19th Massachusetts in the nearby battle- field. Only minutes later we were there, walking the perimeter, advancing as our friend James may have done, separated from history only by time.

Having breathed and reHved the War relentless for the past week, we decided to turn northward towards Frederick, Maryland, where the Museum of Civil War Medicine awaited us. According to his gravestone, James B. Wiggin finished his mil- itary service as a medic, and as his poignant letters home suggested, an early bout with typhoid probably debilitated him to the Musee du Louvre, Paris, at dusk point where his duty was "to work in the hospital It was there on the third and last day of battle that the 19th Massachusetts volunteers rushed to the aid of other exhausted regiments and pushed back the confederates at the second line of defense.

As went the battle, so, eventually, went the war. But this trip was obviously more than just travel. It was a time for Jon and me to shut out the rest of the world and live in the space of our shared curiosity. Ironically, James' shortened life guided us so far back in history, but led us so far ahead in terms of our closeness. I remembered that closeness one day last December when, for some reason, I sud- denly found myself thinking about my own mortality.

I mentally skimmed my "short list" of places I've wanted to take my chil- dren - Prague, Venice, Machu Picchu He had taught mc so much about the Civil War, and I had spent enough months in Paris as a student to feel that if the city and I still belonged together, which we do, then certainly it would embrace my son. Now it was payback time, so in March, we landed in Paris with a guidebook, a map, and two sets of good walking shoe:;. For the first few days, I was in charge.

I carefully outlined the options for explo- ration and let Jon choose, depending on his interest and stamina. Together, we invaded Paris neighborhood by neighborhood, from the stylish and refined "Old City" of the first "arrondissement," to the colorful and elegant Jewish Quarter, to the buzzing Latin Quarter, to the slightly seedier Montmartre.

We lost ourselves in art and in the sociology of the street. We mastered the metro. We threw crumbs of our crepes to Parisian pigeons. It didn't take long, however, until I noticed a subtle change in Jon. His deep appreciation of the world around him, which I had witnessed on our previous trip together, was still very niuch intact.

Despite my best intentions of show- ing him my i'ans, he was showing me his. He walked me up and down the little streets constituting the backdrop for the film Amelie, or, as Parisians have come to identify it, "le Paris d'Amelie PouHn. But not unlike the 19th Massachusetts at Gettysburg, Jon reached his peak under threat of hostility at the Place de la Sorbonne. There, the heat of pre-riot tensions between students and police that sent a chill down my spine and a major yellow streak down my back put a grin on his face as he jogged into the melee, his camera to his eye.

Indeed, watching him frame each of the pictures he took throughout our week together shed new light on this, my son, and his unique, evolving view of the- world. Yes, this trip, too, was obviously more than just travel. Once again, it was a time for us to shut out the rest of the world and live, as before, in the space of our shared curiosity.

But this time, as I walk along the Seine next to an engaged, utterly comfortable and even exhilarated young man, I am suddenly aware that time is pass- ing, the excited but slightly nervous boy who had sat next to me on the plane to Paris nearly a week earlier was evolving before my very eyes.

Poor Mrs. Wiggin never had that luxury. I still fully intend to take my kids to Paris, to Prague, to Venice and Machu Picchu, along with any other wonderful place that hap- pens to turn up on my "short list. As the website wwiv. The idea became reality in summer AH of these atter tive parents had been convinced by the Academy's friend an tutor Howard Sticklor and Associate Director of Admission Isaia Suggs '78 that what their children were about to begin would t a great opportunity and a great experience.

They each decide j that they were willing to bravely risk trusting their children wit strangers. Each student and each parent beHeved what M Sticklor and Mr. Suggs had told them - that this three-week edi cational experience would be a beneficial part of building stronger academic foundation. We took on that responsibility wit absolute confidence.

We became partners that evening with eac other, the children and their parents in building that strongt foundation. Th mornings and evenings were intense, full of new informatioi questions, discussions, homework assignments, tutorial session reading, tests, photography, reports, PowerPoint lessons, interne research, group projects and laughter. Howard taught them explore the impact of theory in science though the study of biol- gy. Academy Spanish teacher Olga DeGrasse introduced them to panish and the history of how the European language found its way ito the Western hemisphere.

Albert DeGrasse taught English and ony through poetry. Their nowledge of Hispaniola was aug- lented by a trip to the Boston listorical Society. Dixon was pleased. The first two Fridays we went off campus to explore and have different kind of fun. On the second Friday we were joined by stu- ents from England who came with akini and former jirofcssional bas- etball player Steve Bucknall ' These counselors were models of what is possible.

In particular, current college students and college graduates who held high stan- dards for themselves were demanding the same high standards for the Project RISE students. The educators in the classroom daily expressed that they believed in the students'abilities and told them they could achieve everything we assigned.

Outside the classroom, these young adults echoed that mes- sage and worked with the stu- dents to help them achieve that goal. Most days ended the same. After a few games of basketball, pizza, video games, teen talk and ice cold popsicles, counselors and coordinators gave the last call for the night. Breakfast at a. Throughout the weeks we witnessed these students learn more about themselves, each other and the work! On the last Friday, the students prepared to show their parents what they hati k'.

Hveryone agreed that il had hccn tlirce weeks wortli risking. Wc all tclt gratcfvil lor the support ot the Acidciny. Duty called them away from their studies to the mil- itary action in Europe and the Pacific. At the Academy, several students left the bucolic rural set- ting where they were preparing for college before they received their diplomas. When Headmaster John M. Some had actually applied for readmission to the Academy after returning from the service but were denied.

The headmaster believes the school officials at the time feared the considerably older and more worldly vets might not be the best peers for the young and innocent students on campus. Some of the vets went back to their pubhc high schools or another prep school or straight to college.

On Memorial Day, May 29, , six former students of the Academy belatedly received their diplomas from Governor Dummer Academy at a ceremony in the school's Moseley Chapel at 12 noon. John R. While the lack of an Academy diploma hardly held these men back from the consid- erable achievements in their lives, receiving John Whitney '44 receives his diploma from Headmaster John M.

Doggett the status of alumnus 60 years later still felt sweet. I was so pleased to be honored; it was terrific. It was great to reunite with old friends. He served in the gun battalion as an anti- aircraft radar operator. Whitney and Company. He still oper- ates the company and resides in Walpole, MA with his wife Katherine. His son. Gordon Hoyt was equally pleased. Weeks after the event, family and friends were sending me cut outs of the story that ran in the Globe and other papers; I was flattered that so many people cared.

Gosh, they look so young. They looked like an excellent cross sec- tion of young people. Army in March of his junior year at the Academy. Since college graduation, Hoyt has worked in the insurance business, cur- rently serving as Chairman of Hermitage Insurance Company. He resides in Queensbury, New York, with his wife Cynthia.

They have two grown children. Homer Ambrose couldn't make the trip but expressed his pleas- ure at the recognition. It's hanging on the wall of my ofiBce," he said. I'm just extremely honored to be remembered by the Academy. He Homer spent 20 years of commissioned service in the U. Army Corps of Engineers. He earned a B.

He is also a gradu- ate of the U. Army Command and General Staff College. Wally Bolton offered an understatement when asked for a reaction to the belated diploma. Wally, a member of the Class of , was inducted into the service in October, and served in Normandy, France, the Rhineland, the Ardennes, and Central Europe. He was a gun crewman and a gunner in an artillery battery of Patton's Third Army His battalion was the first to arrive at St.

Lo, France. At war's end, he was stationed in Linn, Austria. Following the war, he attended Brown University and gr. After graduation, he worked in his fam- ily's business, Bolton-Emerson, Inc. They have three grown children. Dave Barnard, Class of , volunteered for the service in fall of He and his wife Susan have four grown children. When he was notified of the Academy's plans, William "Bill" Barrell, felt honored. After 60 some years, I was very grateful," he said. There were great people, teachers and camaraderie," he recalled.

In February , he was assigned to the 95th Infantry Division. His unit arrived in Europe on August 17, and engaged with enemy forces in northern France, the Rhineland and Central Europe. On November, 20, , he was wounded in action and was subsequently awarded a Purple Heart and Bronze Star.

Upon discharge in June l'M5, he entered the Macintosh School of Accounting and went on to work as Treasurer of his tannly owned business. The Lawrence Duck Company, until he retired in The Acatlcmy hopes to honor any other veterans who K'lt ihe St liool before gradu. Please eont. Throughout my seventeen-year existence, I've been blessed with wonderful family and friends, not to mention an outlook on life that even amazes me at times.

Yet no one ever said life was easy - we face an over- whelming chaos of expectation, confusion, love, hate, and everything in between. As a philosopher, I've always debated the meaning of life and why I was placed on Earth. Sometimes, I feel empowered to rush towards my destiny. At other times, though, I find it almost impossible to gather up the strength to continue. Does life reaUy matter? Of course it does, but we've been known to take it way too seriously.

There's been many a day when I disappear from this mortal realm and ascend into the world of dreams: wondering how a collection of organic mol- ecules can assemble into a sentient, miracu- lous creature capable of absolutely anything he sets his mind to. If most of us don't even know the secret of life, are we taking it for granted? Is focusing on hterary analysis, impHcit differentiation, and poetic meter really as important as my teachers say it is?

Nonetheless, I've always loved to learn, and my times have been filled with awards and recognition for the way I apply my intellect. A great thing, but learning isn't my top pas- sion in life. Ever since I was a little boy, my heart has yearned to reach out to new people and help them in any way I could. Kindness is a price- less treasure; love conquers all. I am Com apart by conflict, and nearly driven to tears by many of the hardships every human being must endure.

But how am I to fight against fighting? Shyness and fear of others' opinions have silenced me for too long. I have finally embraced the potential within nic. My soul is unlocked through love. My only wish is for all hatred to be completely eradicated from this world. I am the guardian of humanity: my brother's keeper, protector of the innocent and destroyer of evil. If only there were more hours in the day, more years in my being - then maybe I would be able to perform my duty. I'm not the only one - there is power in numbers, and I rejoice in the sacred bond of trust between two people that Ave call friendship.

Many have said that I have the golden touch. Looking out at all of you, I disagree: I'm not the miracle worker. My friends, you are the ones with incredible talent, motiva- tion, and powerful minds. I wouldn't be where I am today without you.

Your encour- agement has sent me soaring. You have made yourselves my allies from the first time you met me. And it's about time that I stand up for you. The challenges of modern life can eas- ily overwhelm anyone who isn't ready. So I'm going to share my philosophy on life with you, in hope that I will reenergize your mind, pacify your souls, and prepare you for the journey ahead.

First of all, never give up. A true cham- pion is one who sets a goal and never loses sight of it. Everyone makes mistakes; there's no reason to cry over spilled milk. Have mental toughness and speed, and never be afraid to think something over. Don't let negative remarks slow you down, and do all that you cm. Think about who. Value otiuTs" lut's, hapiimess,. More often than not, you get what you deserve; be friendly, and others will reply in turn. There's no advantage to being mean.

Live, and let live. If there's no reason to interfere when you shouldn't or don't have to, ignore the situation. Even though you control your life completely, interaction with others isn't worthless at all, and can mean the difference between success and failure especially in the world of business.

Have fun. Without joy, this world would be a monotonous and dark place where nothing would be accomplished. Have a good sense of humor. Take things seriously only when you feel it is necessary. Realize that no one is perfect; mistakes are made, and approaching them with a smile is the right way to go.

Be kind. There is nothing in this world as powerful as kindness. Not only does it feel incredible, you'll make so many friends, savor so many moments, and never regret a thing. Respect is the right attitude to have towarcis the world. And, most importantly of all, believe in yourself, and there's nothing you can't do.

Unlock the power widiin, and you'll go far- ther than your wildest dreams. Think of these things whenever you feel troubled. Never be afraid to ask for help: there's always someone there to lend a hand, no matter what. I know I'll be there for all of you. And with that, I leave you to go back to your world, hoping that I've made a differ- ence in this community.

Whether 1 see you every day, every couple of weeks, or just pass by now and then, I respect ami salute every- oiK' here. May our paths cross again. Whittlesey of Chappaqua, NY, died on April 1. He was sole proprietor of J. He is survived by his wife Barbara and three children. Commander and remaining in the USNR for most of his life. After the war, he was a utilities engineer, helping to cre- ate the microwave communications for the state of California. He is best known for developing and co-inventing the Danforth Anchor with his uncle and for authoring many articles about safe boat- ing.

He is survived by his wife Nancy, three sons and several grandchildren. Sumner R. For 30 years, he was an attorney for Tyler and Reynolds Group in Boston before working as a partner for 30 years with Robbins, Noyce and Jansen in Boston. He was active in the Winchester community serving on the boards of sev- eral institutions.

His wife Lydia pre- deceased him. He is survived by two children and four grandchildren. After graduating from the Academy, he became a member of the infamous Amherst College "hurricane" class of After college, he enlisted it the Army Air Corps. Following his serv- ice, he spent 35 years in sales administra- tion and as manager of operations in the home oil heating industry, working for Norwood Oil, Hampden Oil, Waterbury Petroleum Co.

He was an avid golfer and belonged to several golf clubs. He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Patricia, three daughters, six grandchil- dren and five great grandchildren. WilHam H. Later he ran his own management recruiting business. He was also a cham- pion sailor on the Great South Bay. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Joy, a son, and two granddaughters. Dennis Anderson '44 of Florida died on January After graduating from the Academy, he earned a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University.

He is survived by his wife Mary and two sons. Keith A. Johnson '45 of Portland, Maine, died on April An all-state halfback, a three-time All-Telegram catcher, and leading base stealer, he was also a bas- ketball starter and earned an outdoor track letter in the sprints and long jump. He played Twilight League and semi-pro baseball; one of the highlights of his career was playing for the New England All-Star team.

In , he was inducted into the Maine Baseball Hall of Fame. His professional career was in banking and insurance; he retired from UNUM Insurance as a senior group service rep- resentative. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth, three children and several grandchildren. At the Academy he was a strong member of the ski team, known for his performance in the downhill slalom races.

He is survived by his wife Marilyn. At the Academy, he was a major force on the basketball team. He is survived by four children. A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross, he served as a gunnery officer in the navy during the Korean War before working until his retirement as a manufacturing executive at the J.

Cahill Co. A champion golfer, he won nine club championship between and at the Wentworth Fairways as well as the championship at Abenaqui Country Club in Rye Beach. He is sur- vived by his wife of 53 years, Virginia, two sons, a daughter, and three grand- children. A graduate of Harvard College and Columbia School of Journalism, he was a sports promoter for most of his professional career, serv- ing as sports marketing director for Honda for 32 years.

Irv Grossman Public Relations was involved in everything from professional volleyball and racquet- ball to Winston Cup racing. He is credited with, in , convincing heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson's manager, Cus D'Amato, to set up a title fight training center in Oceanside. It was also his sug- gestion in to open the Heisman Trophy to women.

He is survived by his wife Tora, three sons and four grandchildren. William Webster Atwell '51 died on August 8 in Houston, Texas, from compli- cations following liver cancer surgery. After graduating from the Academy, he earned a degree in business from Southern Methodist University. During the Korean War he was stationed in Panama. He began his professional life in the oil business and then became renowned for his success in real estate development and restoration in San Antonio.

He served on the boards of several corporations and clubs. He is survived by his wife of 15 years, Gena, three children, one step-daughter, and nine grandchildren. Edward S. Clapp '53 of Table Grove, Illinois, died on June He is survived by his wife Elsie. Woodbury "Woody" K. Dana III '60 died August 14 after a long illness. He worked for many years for the Coalition for the Psychiatrically Labeled and other programs for those liv- ing with mental illness.

He was a member of the Board of Directors of Shalom House. He was a supporter of local artists and exhibited his own work at the University of New England Art Gallery. He is survived by two sisters and their families. He is survived by his father and siblings. Edward Conway Young '73, former Academy history teacher and assistant headmaster, died on July 10 in Texas after a long illness.

Marks School of Texas. He was a member of Tanner A. Church and Gamma Mu Boule. He leaves his wife of 27 years. Correction: In the spring Archon, it was mistakenly written that George L. Boynton '56 received a Master's degree from Columbia University. In fact, it was his brother Peter who did, though both brothers earned Bachelor's degrees from Stanford. George's children's names were listed as Carly and Lynda; they should have been listed as Carly and Lindy. The editor apologizes for the errors.

The Governor's Academy Other Notes: The Athletic Hall of Fame Committee will make final decisions on new inductees for the fall of to join those inducted in and Gordon '69, Trustee President This Annual Report marks two monumental events at The Governor's Academy: Dan Morgan's retirement after a ten-year term as President of the Board of Trustees and the successful conclusion of the largest capital campaign in the Academy's history.

Both are intertwined, of course, because our recent 50 million dollar campaign had its roots in the strategic vision for our school that Dan and the Board of Trustees worked so hard to develop with Headmasters Bragdon and Doggett over the last decade. Every item on the campaign list requiring funding was researched and reviewed countless times to insure its priority status and its essential contribution to the Academy's mission.

As our school family well knows by now, these critical focal points of the campaign included faculty compensation, scholarship aid, three new major buildings, vast improve- ments in technology on campus, new faculty housing units, new athletic fields, and funds to increase our endowment. Each one of these elements of our long range plan came about because of a determined effort by Dan to incorporate strategic planning as part of his continuing agenda as Board President.

Seeing the plan through to completion is enor- mously rewarding, and much of the credit of the campaign's success rests fully with Dan. Having said that this mission was accomplished, please do not think for a moment that this Board of Trustees and Headmaster have any intention to rest on past laurels.

Change, progress, and innovation are part of the lexicon of our school and are an absolute necessity for us to have remained so vital years into our long history. The Independent School League, of which The Governor's Academy is a proud member, is a very competitive environ- ment, and we must constantly strive to stay ahead of the curve to succeed in our stated goal to be one of the finest small boarding schools in the country.

To borrow a line from the Academy's new view book that was recently published for our prospective applicants: "The competition is fierce at the ISL schools. So are we. Gifts to the Annual Fund pro- mote the continuation of a strong tradition at the Academy. Robert M. Carrie W. Christopher C. Thomas '39 and Eunice Tenney P'69 C. Thomas Tenney, Jr. Turner '83, TR S. Robson Walton P'88 Courtney S. Anonymous Charles C.

Gargaro A. Greenberg '95, TR David M. Morison '88 Richard A. Jeffcott Ogden '76 William F. Stirn '41 James C. Richardson '71 Henry M. Cammett Engineering, Inc. William B. Bates '72 Joseph J. Sherwood C. Brown '81 Norman G. Brown '47 John C. Cohen '91 William S. Coulter '49 Wendy B. Cowie '79 David W.

Culver, Jr. Hayes, Jr. Henry '56 David R. Jaffe '70 Kevin L. James '75 Norman S. Jessop '55 Jonathan K. Jett '93 Ralph F. Johnson '64 E. Knott '47 Nicolas A. LaPierre '92 Andrew D. MacVean '56 J. Scott Magrane, Jr. Anthony Marquis '55 Walter L. McGill '43 George E. McGregor, Jr. Moore, Jr. Stephen G. Morison P'88 Michael K. Mulligan '71 Theodore P.

Quimby '85 Robert M. Tarbell, Jr. Thomas '64 Bowen H. David A. Aron '91 Sideris D. Barrell, Jr. Burgess '84 Michael S. Burke '91 Peter T. Chalfant '57 Childs, Bertman, Tseckares, Inc. Orrin M. Colley '55 Robert B. Conklin '56 Peter R. Cowles '53 Timothy T. Duncan '56 Geoffrey A. Durham '72 Edward M. Sweatt Foundation James J. Healy '56 John E. Kaplan '71 Thomas L. Lamed '82 Matthew Lee '01 Harold 0.

Lord '39 Virginia E. Maurer P'04 R. Neal and Nina McElroy '76 H. Thomas McMeekin '71 Howard D. Morrell '43 J. Davidson Moss '64 Roy C. Nash '59 Thomas Nathan '36 Gordon E. O'Brien '76 John F. O'Dea '64 Coleen G. O'Neal P'09 George Q. Packard, Jr.

Polcari '73 A. Smith '52 Richard J. Tamposi '71 Henry L. Wende '55 John A. Randall '70 and Joan Whitney P'01'05 A. Wise '64 John Witherspoon Mark E. Woodbury '81 Benjamin T. Wright '40 Jessica S. Lars T. Bjork '02 Lindsay R. Gobin '00 Jason G. Greenberg '96, TR Jeffrey R. McDonnell '00 Alexandra Q. McHale '98 Katherine D.

Meyer '96 Meaghan A. Owen '05 Jason S. Salony '00 Eve R. Seamans '00 Michael J. Shedosky '96 Joseph S. Shedosky '01 John C. Shuster '01 Peter L. Wesson '98 Jessica S. Victoria B. Allen '05 Meredith A. Baker '05 Lars T. Bjork '02 Marc I. Borden '03 Emily C. Bryson '04 Leonard S. Ceglarski '04 Kelsey A. Correia '05 Timothy B. Cushman '05 Claire deLacvivier '03 Francesca E. DeMeo '02 Patrick R. Dempsey '04 Rachelle E. Dennis '02 Andrew D. Doggett '04 Brendan C. Giblin '05 Erin K.

Giblin '04 Kathleen A. Glynn '04 Audrie T. Grigun '05 Thomas M. Hyndman '04 Heather S. Jameson '02 Kelsey E. Johnson '05 Michelle A. Kinzie '05 Timothy J. Marsh '02 Gregory R. McDonnell '03 James M. Morrissey '02 Jennifer N. Muscatello '05 Meghan D. O'Malley '03 Kerri L. O'Neill '04 Michael D. O'Neill '03 Meaghan A. Owen '05 Laura A. Pritchard '04 Erin A. Reil '05 Douglas G. Shannahan '03 Caroline A. Sillari '03 Ruth W. Splaine '05 Barrie M. Stavis '05 Hannah Sylvester '05 Amanda J.

Webb '04 Michael C. Barnard Thomas N. Willins, Jr. Broe C. Nelson Corey Frank R. Harris Julian Hess Stafford J. King, Jr. Thomas Nathan John C. Wells aass of Class Agent: Putnam P. Bergmann Putnam P. Flint John A. Hubbard W. Dana Jones Nathaniel N. Lord Edwin C. Andrews Harold H. Audet William R. Ferris Philip J. Hastings Charles T. Henrich Robert F. Phippen Clifford H.

Ellbogen John H. Gannett A. Hewitt Thomas L. Killough John R. Klotz George M. Lord Edmund G. Noyes Philip A. Simpson Donald W. Stockwell Gordon K. Bailey Francis H. Farnum, Jr. John M. Hastings, Jr. Willard S. Little Robert J. Lyle Charles E. McDowell Theodore P.

Munro Robert F. Schumann Edwin S. Sheffield David H. Solomon Frederick Stanger, Jr. Kenneth R Stein A. Roland Will Benjamin T. Wright Sanford P. Young aass of Class Agent: David T. Abbott, Jr. Anonymous Herbert S. Chase Richard T. Cleaver Neal W. Cox David T. Goodhart Lewis E. Hill James Monroe, Jr. Paul S. Morgan Howard F. Stirn Wilbur E. Webster aass of Class Agent: Edward W.

Jarvis D. Robert Kelly William B. Kirkpatrick Peter H. Klaussen Seward E. Pomeroy Humphrey B. Simson Edward W. Brewster Roy E. Leinbach Benjamin E. Mann Walter L. McGill Robert L. Morrell Angus W. Park Philip N. Sawyer Alexander D. Smith Robert S. Tannebring Widgery Thomas, Jr. Robert Wadleigh William C. Wis wall aass of Class Agent James C.

Brillhart William N. Campbell, Jr. Courtland J. Cross Nathaniel N. Dummer Samuel J. Finlay Gordon J. Hoyt Steven K. Kauffman Benjamin Pearson Warren T. Perkins Leonard N. Flavin George A. PolUn John T. Scott Edmund C. Tarbell Malcolm H. Waugh Alan H. Welch John R. Whitney, Jr. Albert L. Our recently completed Capital Campaign, "To Carry on the Work", provided resources critical to upgrade both our facilities and our programs.

If you have visited campus recently, then you have seen first-hand the growth that was fueled by our contributions to the Campaign including a new Performing Arts Center, the Pescosolido Library, the Schumann Math and Science Center, enhanced athletic facilities, increased financial aid and improvements in fac- ulty compensation.

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, we extend sincere thanks to everyone who supported this Campaign. This is just one more example of the way our alumni, parents and friends are working to ensure our future. The Annual Fund has a direct and immediate impact on the day to day lives of the students and faculty who live, learn, work and play here at the Academy. Finally, we extend sincere thanks to all of our volunteers," including our 70 Class Agents, 50 Parent Volunteers and the Board of Trustees, who worked so diligently to encour- age classmates, colleagues and friends to increase their financial support this past fiscal year.

We could not have achieved our goal without their help. The fiscal year is well underway and we respectfully ask, once again, for your ongoing support of The Governor's Academy Annual Fund.

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Enter: Chazown. Prepare to take the journey—to find, name, and live out your Chazown. Expect the Unexpected. Is it possible to have peace in an uncertain world? To not only expect the unexpected but embrace it? Most of us want to have life under control. But God wants us to anticipate the unexpected with a faith deeply rooted in his goodness. He wants us to know that because he is in control, we don't have to be. During this class, you will receive encouragement and practical steps from bestselling author Christine Caine to help you move from anxiety about the unexpected to embracing confident faith in a good God.

You will also learn how to walk into the life God has for you - unknowns and all. Good Girls: Colliding with Destiny. Many women experience struggles and disappointments that keep them from being their true selves. Prepare to follow the life of Ruth whose life was a journey of transformation. She allowed God to transform her circumstances, and went from a widow excluded from society to a wife with a secure and protected future, one that paved the way for the birth of King David.

Her story is full of collisions, but she never let her past define her. Life often looks so very different than we hoped or expected. Some events may simply catch us off guard for a moment, but others shatter us completely. During this study, New York Times bestselling author Lysa TerKeurst unveils her heart amid shattering circumstances and shows you how to live assured when life doesn't turn out like they expected. Prepare to discover the secret of being steadfast and not panicking when God actually does give you more than you can handle and train yourself to recognize the three strategies of the enemy so we can stand strong and persevere through unsettling relationships and uncertain outcomes.

It's Tough Being a Woman. Have you ever felt inadequate, threatened or pushed into situations that seem overpowering? If so, this is the class for you! Join other women in a very personal examination during a study of the Book of Esther. Best selling author, Beth Moore, will help you to peel back the layers of history and show you how very contemporary and applicable the story of Esther is to your life today.

Just as it was tough being a woman in Esther's day, it's tough today. By the end of the class, you will have treasures to aid you in your hurried, harried, and pressured lives. Know Who You Are. No matter how long or short a time you have been a Christian, or how far you are on the journey, you will find The Steps To Freedom In Christ to be a wonderfully refreshing spiritual check-up. It will help you clear away the spiritual cobwebs and connect with Jesus in a deeper way.

Prepare to give God an opportunity to highlight attitudes and behaviors that need to change and to uncover areas where your faith is not as strong as you would like it to be. For anyone who is married, preparing for marriage, or desperate to save a relationship teetering on the edge of disaster, authors Dave and Ann Wilson, marriage coaches for over 30 years, offer hope and strategies that really work.

Vertical Marriage will give you the insight, applications, and inspiration to reconnect with God together and to transform your marriage to everything you hoped it would be. The Power of a Praying Wife. Today's challenges can make a fulfilling marriage seem like an impossible dream. Yet God delights in doing the impossible if only we would ask! During this study, Stormie Omartian shares how God can strengthen your marriage as you pray for your husband concerning key areas in his life, including His spiritual walk, his emotions, his faith and his future, etc.

Join with other wives and prepare to be encouraged by Stormie's own experiences, along with the Bible verses and sample prayers. Can You Hear His Voice. Do you feel that the ability to hear God's voice is for other people and not for you? Is it only for people who lived in Biblical times?

Not at all! The God who loved you enough to die for you loves you enough to talk to you. And wherever you are in your spiritual walk, God will find a way to speak to you in a way you will understand. In this class you will become acquainted with the Voice that has spoken from a fire and a cloud, with visible signs and an invisible Spirit, through a burning bush and burning hearts.

Hear from some of the most well known Christians in history about how God speaks to them, and discover for yourself how you can discern the voice of God. Navigating the Unexpected. Thursdays at 7pm. They're aggravating. Sometimes infuriating. But how you handle interruptions actually tells you more about yourself. The prophet Jonah's existence was interrupted by a call of God that would require a complete change of life. And it scared him enough to make him run in the opposite direction.

Like Jonah, we tend to run from interruptions. When major pains and minor problems cause a hiccup in our carefully calculated plans and goals we head in the opposite direction. Discover the amazing freedom and fulfillment that comes from going with God even when He's going against your grain. Women on a Journey of Faith. Indeed, life with Christ meant a degree turn for the apostle Paul who went from Christian basher to Christian champion, from church attacker to church father.

The same can be true for you. Have you ever looked in the mirror, lingering just a little longer than usual, and realize that you no longer recognize the person staring back at you? You realize your original hopes, dreams or plans have somehow drifted away.

During this class you will be encouraged and learn the importance of the personal process of finding yourself and the beauty of authentically sharing your journey with other women. Vine Chasers. God wants us to flourish. In fact, He delights in our flourishing. He uses all of it to help us flourish and be fruitful. Nothing is for nothing. Join Beth on her journey of discovering what it means to chase vines and to live a life of meaning and fruitfulness.

We love to cheer for the underdog and believe to our core that every life makes a difference. And we are right. We know this is true for our friends when we want to encourage them. Yet, when it comes to the places of our innermost sense of shame and regret, we often wonder if it is really true that God can work all things together for good for those who love Him.

Resource: Judges and Ephesians by J. Greear Right Now Media. The stories and truths within are not just archaic tales with no relevance for us today. Finding Strength in the Invisible War. Resource: The Gospel of John by Dr. Where do you turn when the world around you grows dark? Despite what our culture may argue, there is only one hope that is truly trustworthy and that is our savior, Jesus Christ. Join this class that will draw you back to the essential truths of our faith and the life found in our king.

Life Principles from the Kings of the Old Testament. Following God requires more than just a casual acquaintance with the Father. It requires a deep, working relationship with the One who knows you best. This class will provide you the tools needed to build your faith and learn to live a life totally surrendered to his leading. This class will also help you become the person God has called you to be.

Kingdom Man: A Study of Proverbs. Wednesdays at 10am. See what a God-shaped life looks like when it gets lived out. D Men: Thriving in Babylon. Men stands for Make a Difference Men. Men who are not okay with the mundane and are ready to take the next step in their faith. Men have questions. Real, important and challenging questions and fears about the future. And why do we find it so impossible to grant that same forgiveness to others?

The bottom-line issue of life is forgiveness. Yet few of us have mastered the art of implementing forgiveness in our lives. Wisdom or Folly — You Choose. Does faith do more than keep me from the fun everybody else is having? Why should I obey God when nobody else does?

Does God really expect so much of me? This class for any man who may feel incomplete in his commitment to God. You will find yourself full of spiritual confidence and courage. True Men: Lies that Men Believe. You are being hunted. Like a seasoned angler, our enemy opens his tackle box and selects the lure most likely to attract his intended prey—usually the one we are least likely to consider harmful.

Each lie we bite on causes us to feel pain, lose or injure relationships, and miss out on the abundant life that God wants us to have. This class will help expose the lies that men most commonly believe, and shows you how to combat those lies with the truth.

Once you encounter the holiness of God, your life will never be the same. The Bible is an amazing but sometimes perplexing book to read. One person reads a passage and gleans so much from it, while another is left confused. What's the difference? The difference is that one has been trained in understanding how to ask specific questions of scripture. Join this class, where you can learn how to read and understand the Bible and watch as God's Word comes alive to you more than ever before! How do you know the Bible is God's Word?

What is sin and how can you overcome it? How is Jesus fully God and fully man? Even during this formative time, the James' began conducting small group Bible studies in their home. These home groups would come to be known as Life Groups. To this day, Life Groups continue to play an integral part of New Community's mission and style of ministry.

While still in the developmental years, New Community also began launching intentional strategies for reaching out to men. The commitment to focus on reaching men grew out of Pastor James' passion to build strong homes and communities by reaching and building strong men for Christ.

To this day, a focus on impacting men continues to be an important component in the work of New Community Bible Fellowship. Over the next few months, New Community made the transition from being a Bible Study group to an actual church ministry. Our first Sunday worship service was conducted on April 10, The church was launched with twenty adult members.

Over the next few years the church continued growing spiritually and numerically into a vibrant community of believers, with numerous ministries and two Sunday worship services. By , New Community had grown to members and was greatly in need of a larger facility to accommodate our services and ministries. It was in this same year, after much fasting and prayer the Lord blessed the church to acquire its first facility.

The building- purchased from a Jewish congregation- is located in Cleveland Heights and capable of seating worshippers. In the years to follow, New Community has grown organizationally by refining its governing style, adding officers, ministry leaders, musicians, artists and staff. In an attempt to meet the needs of both our church family and our community, a wide range of ministries started and flourished, such as worship ministry, women's ministry, men's ministry, children's ministry, teen ministries and leadership training programs.

New Community also took on major production goals, such as producing a musical CD, launching city-wide celebration events, and conducting outreach alongside foreign and local mission groups.

FOREX FORMS BLOGS

I carefully outlined the options for explo- ration and let Jon choose, depending on his interest and stamina. Together, we invaded Paris neighborhood by neighborhood, from the stylish and refined "Old City" of the first "arrondissement," to the colorful and elegant Jewish Quarter, to the buzzing Latin Quarter, to the slightly seedier Montmartre. We lost ourselves in art and in the sociology of the street. We mastered the metro. We threw crumbs of our crepes to Parisian pigeons.

It didn't take long, however, until I noticed a subtle change in Jon. His deep appreciation of the world around him, which I had witnessed on our previous trip together, was still very niuch intact. Despite my best intentions of show- ing him my i'ans, he was showing me his.

He walked me up and down the little streets constituting the backdrop for the film Amelie, or, as Parisians have come to identify it, "le Paris d'Amelie PouHn. But not unlike the 19th Massachusetts at Gettysburg, Jon reached his peak under threat of hostility at the Place de la Sorbonne. There, the heat of pre-riot tensions between students and police that sent a chill down my spine and a major yellow streak down my back put a grin on his face as he jogged into the melee, his camera to his eye.

Indeed, watching him frame each of the pictures he took throughout our week together shed new light on this, my son, and his unique, evolving view of the- world. Yes, this trip, too, was obviously more than just travel. Once again, it was a time for us to shut out the rest of the world and live, as before, in the space of our shared curiosity.

But this time, as I walk along the Seine next to an engaged, utterly comfortable and even exhilarated young man, I am suddenly aware that time is pass- ing, the excited but slightly nervous boy who had sat next to me on the plane to Paris nearly a week earlier was evolving before my very eyes. Poor Mrs. Wiggin never had that luxury. I still fully intend to take my kids to Paris, to Prague, to Venice and Machu Picchu, along with any other wonderful place that hap- pens to turn up on my "short list.

As the website wwiv. The idea became reality in summer AH of these atter tive parents had been convinced by the Academy's friend an tutor Howard Sticklor and Associate Director of Admission Isaia Suggs '78 that what their children were about to begin would t a great opportunity and a great experience. They each decide j that they were willing to bravely risk trusting their children wit strangers.

Each student and each parent beHeved what M Sticklor and Mr. Suggs had told them - that this three-week edi cational experience would be a beneficial part of building stronger academic foundation. We took on that responsibility wit absolute confidence. We became partners that evening with eac other, the children and their parents in building that strongt foundation.

Th mornings and evenings were intense, full of new informatioi questions, discussions, homework assignments, tutorial session reading, tests, photography, reports, PowerPoint lessons, interne research, group projects and laughter. Howard taught them explore the impact of theory in science though the study of biol- gy. Academy Spanish teacher Olga DeGrasse introduced them to panish and the history of how the European language found its way ito the Western hemisphere.

Albert DeGrasse taught English and ony through poetry. Their nowledge of Hispaniola was aug- lented by a trip to the Boston listorical Society. Dixon was pleased. The first two Fridays we went off campus to explore and have different kind of fun. On the second Friday we were joined by stu- ents from England who came with akini and former jirofcssional bas- etball player Steve Bucknall ' These counselors were models of what is possible.

In particular, current college students and college graduates who held high stan- dards for themselves were demanding the same high standards for the Project RISE students. The educators in the classroom daily expressed that they believed in the students'abilities and told them they could achieve everything we assigned.

Outside the classroom, these young adults echoed that mes- sage and worked with the stu- dents to help them achieve that goal. Most days ended the same. After a few games of basketball, pizza, video games, teen talk and ice cold popsicles, counselors and coordinators gave the last call for the night. Breakfast at a. Throughout the weeks we witnessed these students learn more about themselves, each other and the work! On the last Friday, the students prepared to show their parents what they hati k'.

Hveryone agreed that il had hccn tlirce weeks wortli risking. Wc all tclt gratcfvil lor the support ot the Acidciny. Duty called them away from their studies to the mil- itary action in Europe and the Pacific. At the Academy, several students left the bucolic rural set- ting where they were preparing for college before they received their diplomas.

When Headmaster John M. Some had actually applied for readmission to the Academy after returning from the service but were denied. The headmaster believes the school officials at the time feared the considerably older and more worldly vets might not be the best peers for the young and innocent students on campus. Some of the vets went back to their pubhc high schools or another prep school or straight to college.

On Memorial Day, May 29, , six former students of the Academy belatedly received their diplomas from Governor Dummer Academy at a ceremony in the school's Moseley Chapel at 12 noon. John R. While the lack of an Academy diploma hardly held these men back from the consid- erable achievements in their lives, receiving John Whitney '44 receives his diploma from Headmaster John M. Doggett the status of alumnus 60 years later still felt sweet.

I was so pleased to be honored; it was terrific. It was great to reunite with old friends. He served in the gun battalion as an anti- aircraft radar operator. Whitney and Company. He still oper- ates the company and resides in Walpole, MA with his wife Katherine. His son. Gordon Hoyt was equally pleased.

Weeks after the event, family and friends were sending me cut outs of the story that ran in the Globe and other papers; I was flattered that so many people cared. Gosh, they look so young. They looked like an excellent cross sec- tion of young people.

Army in March of his junior year at the Academy. Since college graduation, Hoyt has worked in the insurance business, cur- rently serving as Chairman of Hermitage Insurance Company. He resides in Queensbury, New York, with his wife Cynthia. They have two grown children.

Homer Ambrose couldn't make the trip but expressed his pleas- ure at the recognition. It's hanging on the wall of my ofiBce," he said. I'm just extremely honored to be remembered by the Academy. He Homer spent 20 years of commissioned service in the U. Army Corps of Engineers. He earned a B. He is also a gradu- ate of the U. Army Command and General Staff College.

Wally Bolton offered an understatement when asked for a reaction to the belated diploma. Wally, a member of the Class of , was inducted into the service in October, and served in Normandy, France, the Rhineland, the Ardennes, and Central Europe. He was a gun crewman and a gunner in an artillery battery of Patton's Third Army His battalion was the first to arrive at St. Lo, France. At war's end, he was stationed in Linn, Austria.

Following the war, he attended Brown University and gr. After graduation, he worked in his fam- ily's business, Bolton-Emerson, Inc. They have three grown children. Dave Barnard, Class of , volunteered for the service in fall of He and his wife Susan have four grown children.

When he was notified of the Academy's plans, William "Bill" Barrell, felt honored. After 60 some years, I was very grateful," he said. There were great people, teachers and camaraderie," he recalled. In February , he was assigned to the 95th Infantry Division. His unit arrived in Europe on August 17, and engaged with enemy forces in northern France, the Rhineland and Central Europe. On November, 20, , he was wounded in action and was subsequently awarded a Purple Heart and Bronze Star. Upon discharge in June l'M5, he entered the Macintosh School of Accounting and went on to work as Treasurer of his tannly owned business.

The Lawrence Duck Company, until he retired in The Acatlcmy hopes to honor any other veterans who K'lt ihe St liool before gradu. Please eont. Throughout my seventeen-year existence, I've been blessed with wonderful family and friends, not to mention an outlook on life that even amazes me at times. Yet no one ever said life was easy - we face an over- whelming chaos of expectation, confusion, love, hate, and everything in between.

As a philosopher, I've always debated the meaning of life and why I was placed on Earth. Sometimes, I feel empowered to rush towards my destiny. At other times, though, I find it almost impossible to gather up the strength to continue. Does life reaUy matter?

Of course it does, but we've been known to take it way too seriously. There's been many a day when I disappear from this mortal realm and ascend into the world of dreams: wondering how a collection of organic mol- ecules can assemble into a sentient, miracu- lous creature capable of absolutely anything he sets his mind to. If most of us don't even know the secret of life, are we taking it for granted?

Is focusing on hterary analysis, impHcit differentiation, and poetic meter really as important as my teachers say it is? Nonetheless, I've always loved to learn, and my times have been filled with awards and recognition for the way I apply my intellect. A great thing, but learning isn't my top pas- sion in life.

Ever since I was a little boy, my heart has yearned to reach out to new people and help them in any way I could. Kindness is a price- less treasure; love conquers all. I am Com apart by conflict, and nearly driven to tears by many of the hardships every human being must endure. But how am I to fight against fighting? Shyness and fear of others' opinions have silenced me for too long. I have finally embraced the potential within nic.

My soul is unlocked through love. My only wish is for all hatred to be completely eradicated from this world. I am the guardian of humanity: my brother's keeper, protector of the innocent and destroyer of evil. If only there were more hours in the day, more years in my being - then maybe I would be able to perform my duty. I'm not the only one - there is power in numbers, and I rejoice in the sacred bond of trust between two people that Ave call friendship.

Many have said that I have the golden touch. Looking out at all of you, I disagree: I'm not the miracle worker. My friends, you are the ones with incredible talent, motiva- tion, and powerful minds. I wouldn't be where I am today without you. Your encour- agement has sent me soaring. You have made yourselves my allies from the first time you met me. And it's about time that I stand up for you.

The challenges of modern life can eas- ily overwhelm anyone who isn't ready. So I'm going to share my philosophy on life with you, in hope that I will reenergize your mind, pacify your souls, and prepare you for the journey ahead. First of all, never give up. A true cham- pion is one who sets a goal and never loses sight of it. Everyone makes mistakes; there's no reason to cry over spilled milk. Have mental toughness and speed, and never be afraid to think something over.

Don't let negative remarks slow you down, and do all that you cm. Think about who. Value otiuTs" lut's, hapiimess,. More often than not, you get what you deserve; be friendly, and others will reply in turn. There's no advantage to being mean. Live, and let live. If there's no reason to interfere when you shouldn't or don't have to, ignore the situation.

Even though you control your life completely, interaction with others isn't worthless at all, and can mean the difference between success and failure especially in the world of business. Have fun. Without joy, this world would be a monotonous and dark place where nothing would be accomplished. Have a good sense of humor. Take things seriously only when you feel it is necessary.

Realize that no one is perfect; mistakes are made, and approaching them with a smile is the right way to go. Be kind. There is nothing in this world as powerful as kindness. Not only does it feel incredible, you'll make so many friends, savor so many moments, and never regret a thing. Respect is the right attitude to have towarcis the world. And, most importantly of all, believe in yourself, and there's nothing you can't do.

Unlock the power widiin, and you'll go far- ther than your wildest dreams. Think of these things whenever you feel troubled. Never be afraid to ask for help: there's always someone there to lend a hand, no matter what. I know I'll be there for all of you. And with that, I leave you to go back to your world, hoping that I've made a differ- ence in this community.

Whether 1 see you every day, every couple of weeks, or just pass by now and then, I respect ami salute every- oiK' here. May our paths cross again. Whittlesey of Chappaqua, NY, died on April 1. He was sole proprietor of J. He is survived by his wife Barbara and three children. Commander and remaining in the USNR for most of his life.

After the war, he was a utilities engineer, helping to cre- ate the microwave communications for the state of California. He is best known for developing and co-inventing the Danforth Anchor with his uncle and for authoring many articles about safe boat- ing. He is survived by his wife Nancy, three sons and several grandchildren. Sumner R. For 30 years, he was an attorney for Tyler and Reynolds Group in Boston before working as a partner for 30 years with Robbins, Noyce and Jansen in Boston.

He was active in the Winchester community serving on the boards of sev- eral institutions. His wife Lydia pre- deceased him. He is survived by two children and four grandchildren. After graduating from the Academy, he became a member of the infamous Amherst College "hurricane" class of After college, he enlisted it the Army Air Corps.

Following his serv- ice, he spent 35 years in sales administra- tion and as manager of operations in the home oil heating industry, working for Norwood Oil, Hampden Oil, Waterbury Petroleum Co. He was an avid golfer and belonged to several golf clubs. He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Patricia, three daughters, six grandchil- dren and five great grandchildren. WilHam H. Later he ran his own management recruiting business.

He was also a cham- pion sailor on the Great South Bay. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Joy, a son, and two granddaughters. Dennis Anderson '44 of Florida died on January After graduating from the Academy, he earned a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University. He is survived by his wife Mary and two sons. Keith A. Johnson '45 of Portland, Maine, died on April An all-state halfback, a three-time All-Telegram catcher, and leading base stealer, he was also a bas- ketball starter and earned an outdoor track letter in the sprints and long jump.

He played Twilight League and semi-pro baseball; one of the highlights of his career was playing for the New England All-Star team. In , he was inducted into the Maine Baseball Hall of Fame. His professional career was in banking and insurance; he retired from UNUM Insurance as a senior group service rep- resentative.

He is survived by his wife Elizabeth, three children and several grandchildren. At the Academy he was a strong member of the ski team, known for his performance in the downhill slalom races. He is survived by his wife Marilyn. At the Academy, he was a major force on the basketball team. He is survived by four children. A graduate of the College of the Holy Cross, he served as a gunnery officer in the navy during the Korean War before working until his retirement as a manufacturing executive at the J.

Cahill Co. A champion golfer, he won nine club championship between and at the Wentworth Fairways as well as the championship at Abenaqui Country Club in Rye Beach. He is sur- vived by his wife of 53 years, Virginia, two sons, a daughter, and three grand- children. A graduate of Harvard College and Columbia School of Journalism, he was a sports promoter for most of his professional career, serv- ing as sports marketing director for Honda for 32 years.

Irv Grossman Public Relations was involved in everything from professional volleyball and racquet- ball to Winston Cup racing. He is credited with, in , convincing heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson's manager, Cus D'Amato, to set up a title fight training center in Oceanside.

It was also his sug- gestion in to open the Heisman Trophy to women. He is survived by his wife Tora, three sons and four grandchildren. William Webster Atwell '51 died on August 8 in Houston, Texas, from compli- cations following liver cancer surgery. After graduating from the Academy, he earned a degree in business from Southern Methodist University.

During the Korean War he was stationed in Panama. He began his professional life in the oil business and then became renowned for his success in real estate development and restoration in San Antonio. He served on the boards of several corporations and clubs. He is survived by his wife of 15 years, Gena, three children, one step-daughter, and nine grandchildren.

Edward S. Clapp '53 of Table Grove, Illinois, died on June He is survived by his wife Elsie. Woodbury "Woody" K. Dana III '60 died August 14 after a long illness. He worked for many years for the Coalition for the Psychiatrically Labeled and other programs for those liv- ing with mental illness. He was a member of the Board of Directors of Shalom House. He was a supporter of local artists and exhibited his own work at the University of New England Art Gallery. He is survived by two sisters and their families.

He is survived by his father and siblings. Edward Conway Young '73, former Academy history teacher and assistant headmaster, died on July 10 in Texas after a long illness. Marks School of Texas. He was a member of Tanner A.

Church and Gamma Mu Boule. He leaves his wife of 27 years. Correction: In the spring Archon, it was mistakenly written that George L. Boynton '56 received a Master's degree from Columbia University. In fact, it was his brother Peter who did, though both brothers earned Bachelor's degrees from Stanford. George's children's names were listed as Carly and Lynda; they should have been listed as Carly and Lindy. The editor apologizes for the errors. The Governor's Academy Other Notes: The Athletic Hall of Fame Committee will make final decisions on new inductees for the fall of to join those inducted in and Gordon '69, Trustee President This Annual Report marks two monumental events at The Governor's Academy: Dan Morgan's retirement after a ten-year term as President of the Board of Trustees and the successful conclusion of the largest capital campaign in the Academy's history.

Both are intertwined, of course, because our recent 50 million dollar campaign had its roots in the strategic vision for our school that Dan and the Board of Trustees worked so hard to develop with Headmasters Bragdon and Doggett over the last decade. Every item on the campaign list requiring funding was researched and reviewed countless times to insure its priority status and its essential contribution to the Academy's mission.

As our school family well knows by now, these critical focal points of the campaign included faculty compensation, scholarship aid, three new major buildings, vast improve- ments in technology on campus, new faculty housing units, new athletic fields, and funds to increase our endowment. Each one of these elements of our long range plan came about because of a determined effort by Dan to incorporate strategic planning as part of his continuing agenda as Board President.

Seeing the plan through to completion is enor- mously rewarding, and much of the credit of the campaign's success rests fully with Dan. Having said that this mission was accomplished, please do not think for a moment that this Board of Trustees and Headmaster have any intention to rest on past laurels.

Change, progress, and innovation are part of the lexicon of our school and are an absolute necessity for us to have remained so vital years into our long history. The Independent School League, of which The Governor's Academy is a proud member, is a very competitive environ- ment, and we must constantly strive to stay ahead of the curve to succeed in our stated goal to be one of the finest small boarding schools in the country.

To borrow a line from the Academy's new view book that was recently published for our prospective applicants: "The competition is fierce at the ISL schools. So are we. Gifts to the Annual Fund pro- mote the continuation of a strong tradition at the Academy. Robert M. Carrie W. Christopher C. Thomas '39 and Eunice Tenney P'69 C. Thomas Tenney, Jr. Turner '83, TR S. Robson Walton P'88 Courtney S. Anonymous Charles C.

Gargaro A. Greenberg '95, TR David M. Morison '88 Richard A. Jeffcott Ogden '76 William F. Stirn '41 James C. Richardson '71 Henry M. Cammett Engineering, Inc. William B. Bates '72 Joseph J. Sherwood C. Brown '81 Norman G. Brown '47 John C. Cohen '91 William S. Coulter '49 Wendy B. Cowie '79 David W. Culver, Jr. Hayes, Jr. Henry '56 David R. Jaffe '70 Kevin L. James '75 Norman S. Jessop '55 Jonathan K. Jett '93 Ralph F. Johnson '64 E. Knott '47 Nicolas A. LaPierre '92 Andrew D. MacVean '56 J. Scott Magrane, Jr.

Anthony Marquis '55 Walter L. McGill '43 George E. McGregor, Jr. Moore, Jr. Stephen G. Morison P'88 Michael K. Mulligan '71 Theodore P. Quimby '85 Robert M. Tarbell, Jr. Thomas '64 Bowen H. David A. Aron '91 Sideris D. Barrell, Jr. Burgess '84 Michael S. Burke '91 Peter T. Chalfant '57 Childs, Bertman, Tseckares, Inc. Orrin M. Colley '55 Robert B. Conklin '56 Peter R. Cowles '53 Timothy T.

Duncan '56 Geoffrey A. Durham '72 Edward M. Sweatt Foundation James J. Healy '56 John E. Kaplan '71 Thomas L. Lamed '82 Matthew Lee '01 Harold 0. Lord '39 Virginia E. Maurer P'04 R. Neal and Nina McElroy '76 H. Thomas McMeekin '71 Howard D. Morrell '43 J. Davidson Moss '64 Roy C. Nash '59 Thomas Nathan '36 Gordon E. O'Brien '76 John F. O'Dea '64 Coleen G. O'Neal P'09 George Q. Packard, Jr. Polcari '73 A. Smith '52 Richard J. Tamposi '71 Henry L.

Wende '55 John A. Randall '70 and Joan Whitney P'01'05 A. Wise '64 John Witherspoon Mark E. Woodbury '81 Benjamin T. Wright '40 Jessica S. Lars T. Bjork '02 Lindsay R. Gobin '00 Jason G. Greenberg '96, TR Jeffrey R. McDonnell '00 Alexandra Q. McHale '98 Katherine D. Meyer '96 Meaghan A. Owen '05 Jason S. Salony '00 Eve R. Seamans '00 Michael J. Shedosky '96 Joseph S.

Shedosky '01 John C. Shuster '01 Peter L. Wesson '98 Jessica S. Victoria B. Allen '05 Meredith A. Baker '05 Lars T. Bjork '02 Marc I. Borden '03 Emily C. Bryson '04 Leonard S. Ceglarski '04 Kelsey A. Correia '05 Timothy B. Cushman '05 Claire deLacvivier '03 Francesca E. DeMeo '02 Patrick R. Dempsey '04 Rachelle E. Dennis '02 Andrew D. Doggett '04 Brendan C. Giblin '05 Erin K. Giblin '04 Kathleen A. Glynn '04 Audrie T. Grigun '05 Thomas M. Hyndman '04 Heather S. Jameson '02 Kelsey E. Johnson '05 Michelle A.

Kinzie '05 Timothy J. Marsh '02 Gregory R. McDonnell '03 James M. Morrissey '02 Jennifer N. Muscatello '05 Meghan D. O'Malley '03 Kerri L. O'Neill '04 Michael D. O'Neill '03 Meaghan A. Owen '05 Laura A. Pritchard '04 Erin A. Reil '05 Douglas G. Shannahan '03 Caroline A. Sillari '03 Ruth W. Splaine '05 Barrie M.

Stavis '05 Hannah Sylvester '05 Amanda J. Webb '04 Michael C. Barnard Thomas N. Willins, Jr. Broe C. Nelson Corey Frank R. Harris Julian Hess Stafford J. King, Jr. Thomas Nathan John C. Wells aass of Class Agent: Putnam P. Bergmann Putnam P. Flint John A. Hubbard W. Dana Jones Nathaniel N. Lord Edwin C. Andrews Harold H. Audet William R. Ferris Philip J. Hastings Charles T. Henrich Robert F. Phippen Clifford H. Ellbogen John H. Gannett A. Hewitt Thomas L. Killough John R.

Klotz George M. Lord Edmund G. Noyes Philip A. Simpson Donald W. Stockwell Gordon K. Bailey Francis H. Farnum, Jr. John M. Hastings, Jr. Willard S. Little Robert J. Lyle Charles E. McDowell Theodore P. Munro Robert F. Schumann Edwin S. Sheffield David H. Solomon Frederick Stanger, Jr. Kenneth R Stein A. Roland Will Benjamin T. Wright Sanford P. Young aass of Class Agent: David T. Abbott, Jr. Anonymous Herbert S. Chase Richard T. Cleaver Neal W. Cox David T. Goodhart Lewis E.

Hill James Monroe, Jr. Paul S. Morgan Howard F. Stirn Wilbur E. Webster aass of Class Agent: Edward W. Jarvis D. Robert Kelly William B. Kirkpatrick Peter H. Klaussen Seward E. Pomeroy Humphrey B. Simson Edward W. Brewster Roy E. Leinbach Benjamin E. Mann Walter L. McGill Robert L. Morrell Angus W. Park Philip N. Sawyer Alexander D. Smith Robert S. Tannebring Widgery Thomas, Jr. Robert Wadleigh William C.

Wis wall aass of Class Agent James C. Brillhart William N. Campbell, Jr. Courtland J. Cross Nathaniel N. Dummer Samuel J. Finlay Gordon J. Hoyt Steven K. Kauffman Benjamin Pearson Warren T. Perkins Leonard N. Flavin George A. PolUn John T. Scott Edmund C. Tarbell Malcolm H. Waugh Alan H. Welch John R. Whitney, Jr. Albert L. Our recently completed Capital Campaign, "To Carry on the Work", provided resources critical to upgrade both our facilities and our programs. If you have visited campus recently, then you have seen first-hand the growth that was fueled by our contributions to the Campaign including a new Performing Arts Center, the Pescosolido Library, the Schumann Math and Science Center, enhanced athletic facilities, increased financial aid and improvements in fac- ulty compensation.

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, we extend sincere thanks to everyone who supported this Campaign. This is just one more example of the way our alumni, parents and friends are working to ensure our future. The Annual Fund has a direct and immediate impact on the day to day lives of the students and faculty who live, learn, work and play here at the Academy. Finally, we extend sincere thanks to all of our volunteers," including our 70 Class Agents, 50 Parent Volunteers and the Board of Trustees, who worked so diligently to encour- age classmates, colleagues and friends to increase their financial support this past fiscal year.

We could not have achieved our goal without their help. The fiscal year is well underway and we respectfully ask, once again, for your ongoing support of The Governor's Academy Annual Fund. Barnard William A.

Stephen D. Bean Edgar S. Catlin, Jr. Richard A. Cousins Warren W. Furth John S. Gillies, Jr. David P. Graham William J. Hale Stanley A. Hamel Edward C. Haynes, Jr. Lon W. Homeier Edwin L. Hubbard Brewster W. Jameson Archibald J. Kingsley Leon L. Noyes Arthur S. Page, Jr. Donald G. Palais Bradley H. Roberts Robert S. Steinert, Jr. Warren G. Symonds Allan H.

Teel Irvine F. Williamson B. Botsford Young, Jr. Chase Paul B. Gaudin Herbert J. Levine Douglas L. Snoop Dogg hands out Thanksgiving turkeys in California From California to New York to Texas and Iowa, thousands of Americans on Monday received a Thankgiving helping hand thanks to food banks and volunteer.

Jurassic lark! Coronavirus UK: Grant Shapps reduces quarantine to FIVE From December 15, the 'test to release' plan will allow arrivals from high-risk destinations to get a private coronavirus test after a five-day self.

Satellite images show China has built a village US-based satellite operator Maxar Technologies, who photographed the series of aerial images, said they show 'significant construction activity' th. Puppy thief warning: Hunt after man tried to A DOG owner has described the horrifying moment a brazen would-be thief attempted to snatch her puppy from her arms.

Family services will be in 'deep trouble' unless The state can be so negligent to youngsters in its care that if it were a parent it would risk losing them, a watchdog is set to warn. Covid rules: The areas most in danger of COVID rules are being "willfully disregarded" in one of the UK's most infected areas in England according to the local council leader. But which ar. Is lockdown failing? In a pandemic?! Urgent bomb warning: Fears local took unexploded war Police fear someone may have taken an explosive shell home with them after finding it on a wall.

An urgent warning has been issued after the wartime o. Dad who hurled baby son into river denies Zak Bennett-Eko, 23, was suffering from paranoid schizophrenia at the time of the incident, jurors were told. Husband and wife of 63 years hold hands Due to the coronavirus pandemic, they were not able to physically reunite as as Freddie lives in a care home and visits were either totally banned or.

UK facing Christmas tree shortage because Denmark is Supply chains are being impacted by a travel ban that was introduced earlier this month. Moment paedophile who targeted 5, children was finally David Wilson admitted to 96 offences against 51 victims, with his youngest being four-year-old boys. Eight officers investigated after black woman restrained and Two of the officers have been placed on restricted duties while the probe by the Independent Office for Police Conduct IOPC continues.

Fight breaks out over which tier London should There has been confusion over which tier the capital will fall into after December 2. Wallaby on the loose spotted hopping around small But wallabies are actually more common in this country than you would think. The areas likely to be put into tier Here are the 15 areas with the highest infection rates across England at the moment.

Original Tier 3 restrictions not tough enough, Hancock The toughest COVID restrictions imposed before England's second lockdown were not strong enough, the health secretary has told MPs. England and Aston Villa star Grealish pleads guilty Aston Villa and England footballer Jack Grealish has pleaded guilty to two charges of careless driving.

COVID app payment loophole won't be fixed by People who are told to isolate by the contact tracing app will not be able to claim financial support after lockdown ends, and may not be able to befo. Household mixing and five-day window: Meeting to look Michael Gove will chair a COBRA meeting with devolved administrations later as discussions continue about Christmas rules, according to government sou.

Greater Manchester mayor hits back after minister says A minister has launched a thinly-veiled attack on the mayor of Greater Manchester as he explained why the government will not be entering into talks w. Harry Dunn's parents lose High Court battle against Harry Dunn's parents have lost their High Court battle against the Foreign Office over whether their son's alleged killer had diplomatic immunity. Police appeal over 'cowardly' attack on female officer A female police officer was subject to a "cowardly and dangerous" attack with a glass bottle, hours before England went into lockdown.

Travellers can cut quarantine on arrival from next Travellers who arrive in England from countries with high infection rates will be able to shorten their quarantine from 14 days to five if they test n. PM: 'Vast majority' of vulnerable people could get Boris Johnson has suggested the "vast majority" of people most vulnerable to coronavirus could be vaccinated against the disease by Easter. Labour chief whip tells Corbyn to apologise 'unequivocally' Jeremy Corbyn has been told by Labour's chief whip to apologise "unequivocally, unambiguously and without reservation" for his reaction to a damnin.

Prisoner found guilty of murdering paedophile Richard Huckle A prisoner has been found guilty of murdering one of Britain's worst paedophiles, Richard Huckle. While on a missi. Richard Wilbanks, 74, acted swiftly when his 3-month-old pup Gunner was snatc.

On Friday,. Pub Closing Times: Will The New 11pm Rule The three tier system will return from next Wednesday, bringing yet another set of rules we need to get our heads around.

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